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Fans were unenthused when Porsche first introduced the new 718 Boxster/Cayman powered by turbocharged flat-fours, but even critics can’t deny just how fast the new Boxster is.

The one driven by Carlos Lago in the latest episode of Ignition was a the Boxster S with a turbocharged 2.5 litre engine, delivering 350 horsepower and 305 lb-ft of torque from lower revs. That’s enough to have the Boxster S sprinting from zero to 62 mph in just 4.2 seconds and its top speed of 177 mph can quickly tear through the race track.

Paired with a seven-speed PDK transmission, the Boxster S has a broader power band compared to its predecessor and it’ll provide ample power no matter which gear you’re in. Another bonus for track orientated drivers is just how tight the gear spacing is, so you never have to second guess which gear the car’s in even if you’re shifting manually.

Power isn’t everything and Porsche is aware of this, that’s why the Boxster’s balance was designed to be both neutral and playful. There’s a little bit of trailing throttle oversteer right when you want it going into a corner.

It’s so much fun to drive that lap times become a secondary concern, but for those who are interested, the 718 Boxster S came in 2/10ths behind the 2016 Cayman GT4.

 

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Fans were unenthused when Porsche first introduced the new 718 Boxster/Cayman powered by turbocharged flat-fours, but even critics can’t deny just how fast the new Boxster is.

The one driven by Carlos Lago in the latest episode of Ignition was a the Boxster S with a turbocharged 2.5 litre engine, delivering 350 horsepower and 305 lb-ft of torque from lower revs. That’s enough to have the Boxster S sprinting from zero to 62 mph in just 4.2 seconds and its top speed of 177 mph can quickly tear through the race track.

Paired with a seven-speed PDK transmission, the Boxster S has a broader power band compared to its predecessor and it’ll provide ample power no matter which gear you’re in. Another bonus for track orientated drivers is just how tight the gear spacing is, so you never have to second guess which gear the car’s in even if you’re shifting manually.

Power isn’t everything and Porsche is aware of this, that’s why the Boxster’s balance was designed to be both neutral and playful. There’s a little bit of trailing throttle oversteer right when you want it going into a corner.

It’s so much fun to drive that lap times become a secondary concern, but for those who are interested, the 718 Boxster S came in 2/10ths behind the 2016 Cayman GT4.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F4yUKAm1No
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Carlos needs to stop quoting Porsche's understated performance numbers. The real number is 3.6 seconds for the 0-60 mph with the PDK and sport gear as validated in Car & Driver instrumentation testing.

2017 Porsche 718 Cayman S PDK Test ? Review ? Car and Driver
 

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"real" is a relative term... I took my Boxster S to the local drag strip (bone stock on the factory Pirelli tires) and did a 11.722 @ 117.12mph. That's roughly 3/10th of a second quicker than the 12.0 1/4 mile that Car and Driver reported. Based on my car's 60 foot time of 1.742 and 1/8th mile of 7.547 @ 93.47mph it probably hit 60mph in under 3.5 seconds.
 

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When I purchased my 2019 718 Cayman S in late 2018, my SA told me that the 2.5 liter turbo 4 was a better engine than the flat six. I heard him but I didn't really believe it. I now believe it, but I had to "make the journey to get here." Note: This was after I pulled the Soundaktor fuse.

I "drank the Kool-Aid" about how bad the 2.5 liter turbo four engine was. When Porsche came out with the new 4.0 liter flat six, I immediately ordered one and I loved it. What I realized though, is that maximum performance is so high up in the rev range that it is not really accessible on the road. I could "put my foot in it," but only for a second or two.

The sound of the 4.0 liter flat six did not make the hair on the back of my neck stand up like it did in the 2.7 liter 981 base Cayman. The 4.0 liter engine is also very thirsty. I could get 30 mpg with the 2.5 liter turbo four.

I have now come full circle. I sold my CGTS 4.0 last month and I am in the process of ordering another 2.5 liter Cayman S. I miss the mid-range torque of the 2.5 liter turbo. It is better for what I do. It might not sound quite as good, but the mid-range torque is so accessible on the road. That is where the 2.5 liter turbo really offers incomparable performance. I could enjoy it every time a drove the car, for more than a few seconds at a time.

So that's my story. I am waiting for a 2023 Cayman S allocation
 

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When I purchased my 2019 718 Cayman S in late 2018, my SA told me that the 2.5 liter turbo 4 was a better engine than the flat six. I heard him but I didn't really believe it. I now believe it, but I had to "make the journey to get here." Note: This was after I pulled the Soundaktor fuse.

I "drank the Kool-Aid" about how bad the 2.5 liter turbo four engine was. When Porsche came out with the new 4.0 liter flat six, I immediately ordered one and I loved it. What I realized though, is that maximum performance is so high up in the rev range that it is not really accessible on the road. I could "put my foot in it," but only for a second or two.

The sound of the 4.0 liter flat six did not make the hair on the back of my neck stand up like it did in the 2.7 liter 981 base Cayman. The 4.0 liter engine is also very thirsty. I could get 30 mpg with the 2.5 liter turbo four.

I have now come full circle. I sold my CGTS 4.0 last month and I am in the process of ordering another 2.5 liter Cayman S. I miss the mid-range torque of the 2.5 liter turbo. It is better for what I do. It might not sound quite as good, but the mid-range torque is so accessible on the road. That is where the 2.5 liter turbo really offers incomparable performance. I could enjoy it every time a drove the car, for more than a few seconds at a time.

So that's my story. I am waiting for a 2023 Cayman S allocation
Have effectively the same feelings regarding our departed '17 BS and our '22 BGTS 4.0. The 2.5L was perfect in my mind everywhere, except on track where it was plagued by the limp mode issue. Had it not been for the limp mode, then it would still be in our garage today, since the plan was to use mostly on track. Fortunately, this is where the BGTS positively shines.
Regardless, both engines are fabulous....and now that the limp mode problem has been flushed out of the BS, since model year 2019, there is no bad choice between the two for whatever one's plans are for the car.
 
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