Porsche 718 Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I'm looking for anyone who has had the same issue as me.

My car has gone into my local OPC, who advise that it has 2 seized coil bolts, they say they have to be drilled out a time consuming job, one which they plan to charge me for.

My car is still with them, they are not telling me hen it will be finished and ready for collection, in fact they are telling me very little.

My view is that I am paying them to replace the plugs as part of the service, if they find it hard to remove some bolts that is their problem, not mine.

I would be very interested to hear from anyone who has experience this or knows anyone who has.


Adam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
It seems to me they stripped the heads of the bolts or they snapped of from excessive force. A good mechanic would have felt the resistance was to high and would soak them or heat them to remove I would not agree to pay for the added time they need to drill them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,370 Posts
If the car is still under warranty, they own this job IMO. And as @CupraLeon said, there's a possibility they caused the problem.

If they balk, tell them you'll pick up the car and have another shop take care of it. Then see how they react. They may have already started the job and the bolts are now broken. They would not have the ability to put things back in place if they already started and the bolts snapped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
If it was my car and I came across doing the work myself (outside of warranty), I would just leave the old plugs in. I presume stock plugs are a pretty descent platinum plug. They can last a long time with no detriment to performance/economy etc. There was a time when copper tipped plugs would wear over time and the result was the engine missfiring... necessitating regular replacement. I think in modern cars this is nolonger an issue. I would prefer to leave some plugs in until they became an issue then to drill bolts out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I'll bet dollars to donuts that they broke the coil bolts when reinstalling them. It's interesting that it took him two tries before he discovered what was going on. These fasteners don't "just break". Either they were over torqued when they did the work this time or the person who changed the plugs last time did it. But it did not "just happen", that's for sure. I don't know if your 718 is similar to my car or not, but if it is, I'll say this:

I recently changed the plugs and coils packs on my Panamera. The job was easy and saved me a ton of money. Plus I didn't have to worry about some low level mechanic at the Porsche dealership screwing things up. In addition, my car was out of service only for about two hours. It would have been less, but I also detailed the engine compartment while I had the hood up.

The coil pack must be removed in order to get to the plugs. The key do doing this job correctly is to realize that for some unknown reason, Porsche elected to make the fasteners which hold down the coil packs out of aluminum. This makes absolutely no sense to me, but that's the way it is, so if (like many other situations in life) if the person doing the job is a complete idiot, the results will not be good. In spite of Porsche's poor design decision, this fact is NOT a secret and it's well covered on the Internet as well as various Porsche maintenance documents explaining how to do this job. It sounds to me like your mechanic missed this little factoid.

An crusty old U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer involved in maintaining aircraft once told me his thumb rule for how to torque down a bolt. He said, "Tighten 'er down til she strips and then back off half a turn". He was kidding, but perhaps your "Certified" Porsche mechanic took that advice to heart. That technique works best for steel fasteners into steel............ for aluminum fasteners............ not so much.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top