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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just thought I'd post my experience/review of the Girodisc Rotors for 718 S/GTS models.

Firstly, the larger GiroDisc are not any lighter than OEM but with the alloy hats the weights come out very similar so there is not really any weight penalisation. If you want to go lighter carbon ceramics seem to be the only option.

I used our regular bathroom scales so not the most accurate but you get an idea:

OEM Front 330mm Rotor 9.7kg, GiroDisc 350mm Front Rotor 10.3kg (measured ~ 353mm)

OEM Rear 299mm Rotors 5.6kg, GiroDisc 325mm Rear Rotors 5.7kg (note these measured closer to ~322mm)

As far as braking goes there might be a perceived psychological improvement but otherwise no issues and I have not noticed any fade even after 5 or 6 laps on a short track. I did have to get my workshop to adjust the rear E-brake so the hub tolerances must have been marginally different.

Asthetically I think they look nice, particularly the anodised alloy hats in contrast to the OEM Porsche rotors which always look rusty.

Here is what's in the kit including front and rear caliper spacers and longer bolts:

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Very nice Don! Those new rotors do indeed look very fetching. And I get where you are coming from about the rust on the OEM rotor hats being cosmetically annoying.

Having said that I just got new rotors/pads/fluid as well (and Cup2s +wheel align aiming for max symmetrical negative camber). But I stayed with OEM as they have served me well on the track and during daily drive usage (plus that's what my workshop recommended for my level of track experience/usage).

If you don't mind me asking, what were the cost of the Girodisc rotors compared to OEM?

Also which track did you go to? I'm still enjoying Luddenham (and making improvements every time I go) but I'm also on the lookout for new tracks to try out :)
 

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Very nice, “mucho liko” (y)

ps - your badge isn’t straight on the front wheel;)
 

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Very much interested in knowing the cost of such an upgrade. What about your PSCUP2, Happy with them? Does the suspension follows? I'm also considering CUP tires for my 718S. Still wondering if they won't spoil the rest of the car which is stock... Thanks for your input!
 

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The calipers fit the larger rotors without issues? The pads are covering the full width of the rotor? What pads did you go with?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Very nice Don! Those new rotors do indeed look very fetching. And I get where you are coming from about the rust on the OEM rotor hats being cosmetically annoying.

Having said that I just got new rotors/pads/fluid as well (and Cup2s +wheel align aiming for max symmetrical negative camber). But I stayed with OEM as they have served me well on the track and during daily drive usage (plus that's what my workshop recommended for my level of track experience/usage).

If you don't mind me asking, what were the cost of the Girodisc rotors compared to OEM?

Also which track did you go to? I'm still enjoying Luddenham (and making improvements every time I go) but I'm also on the lookout for new tracks to try out :)
I'm not sure of the price difference between Girodisc and OEM but to start it is an expensive upgrade. I think Clark from one of the US supplier's on here does offer a discount to 718forum members. I'd imagine buying the rotors only is not too bad. I purchased locally and can dig up my invoice somewhere if you need it.

I drove at Wakefield Park, kind of a smallish circuit and not too fast. Was my first "proper" track day so I took it fairly easy. Car was great and well beyond my current ability on the track. I am more an alpine driver. The guys I am usually ahead of in the mountains were a little faster on the track but they did have more track specific tires but are also quite good track drivers, which is mainly where the speed differential was.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also with the straight slot rotors, did you notice any different noise or vibrations during hard or high speed braking?
No vibration or anything. Very smooth. I believe the Girodisc are floating rotors so maybe a little smoother for high speed braking. Main straight is about 180/90km/h so quite a heavy brake at the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Very much interested in knowing the cost of such an upgrade. What about your PSCUP2, Happy with them? Does the suspension follows? I'm also considering CUP tires for my 718S. Still wondering if they won't spoil the rest of the car which is stock... Thanks for your input!
It was Clark at Apex Performance that does the deals on Girodisc. Last years US pricing was around $2000US for the set with the discount, exc. shipping. Check with Clark for current pricing and ask for your 718Forum discount :)

The Cup 2 tires are great. Definitley a bit of extra traction but the standard tires are also good. Depends on your level of driving skill. I wasn't doing the Cup2s justice on the track but I am definitely faster through the mountains and not really any compromise in terms of comfort or noise.

I also used a DSC-V3 controller which definitely gave me faster lap times 1-2 sec on a short circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The calipers fit the larger rotors without issues? The pads are covering the full width of the rotor? What pads did you go with?
I'm still using OEM pads as I don't track regularly so still have a bit of life with them.

Notice in the first couple of photos the spacers which move the caliper out slightly further to accomodate the larger rotor.

Pad coverage is good, but you can go the larger 6 piston caliper if you need more.

I should add there is also a stud conversion kit for the caliper bolts if you are a regular track driver and need to change your pads a lot.
 

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I'm still using OEM pads as I don't track regularly so still have a bit of life with them.

Notice in the first couple of photos the spacers which move the caliper out slightly further to accomodate the larger rotor.

Pad coverage is good, but you can go the larger 6 piston caliper if you need more.

I should add there is also a stud conversion kit for the caliper bolts if you are a regular track driver and need to change your pads a lot.
Thanks for the reply. Larger calipers would certainly be better, but obviously in a different stratosphere in terms of cost. So the pads engage the full width of the braking surface? If not, wouldn't the benefits of the conversion be lost? How is the feel vs stock? Also, isn't it good practice to change the pads when installing new rotors so they can bed together properly?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the reply. Larger calipers would certainly be better, but obviously in a different stratosphere in terms of cost. So the pads engage the full width of the braking surface? If not, wouldn't the benefits of the conversion be lost? How is the feel vs stock? Also, isn't it good practice to change the pads when installing new rotors so they can bed together properly?
Maybe the larger Girodisc rotor gives the brakes slightly better feel over stock. It means there can be a little less pad/brake pressure to achieve the same braking force but maybe the noticeable benefit is more psychological. I think the floating rotor design on the Girodisc (rather than the fixed OEM) can also help with brake feel under some situations.

The Porsche 6 piston calipers also require a larger Master Cylinder so you are looking at unnecesary extra cost IMO for most purposes. I think even the GiroDisc upgrade for most people is not necessary but if you need to replace your rotors anyway then it is a nice upgrade. If you were doing a very long race, maybe 1 hour or more I think the larger 6 piston caliper and rotors become more important, otherwise the GiroDisc seems plenty good enough for many track drivers.

The braking surface on the GiroDisc is the same size as the OEM rotor so the pads do engage the full width of the braking surface. You can see the bedding in on the full width of the rotor surface in the photo below. I think if you compare this to the bedding on the OEM rotor above, maybe the coverage of the GiroDisc is a little better/more precise.

My OEM pads were still in good condition so I kept them but sure a lot of people upgrade pads with the rotors. However, if your pads are still good you can have your workshop burnish the pads and bed them in as per usual. I don't think there is any disadvantage, but as noted above some people say you should not reuse the caliper bolts too often if you are changing pads regularly, which in any case you should also get the caliper stud kit.

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so best i could tell, a pair of girodiscs are 1k, a set of new oem rotors are like 400. I know to change the giros you don't have to change the hat so it's cheaper down the line if you do multiple changes. . .i've had my 718CS for a little more than a year and about 10 track days and my front rotors are about done, not the pads interestingly, trying to figure out what's the best for me. if the giros don't ADD any better breaking, and are more upfront, you'd have to keep them and replace them a few times to make sense over the stocks, no? just trying to learn.
 

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Yes, it's a long-run cost-savings, but if you're hard on your brakes the OEMs can stress crack early in their lifespan, whereas the Giros won't, thus tilting the balance towards the GiroDiscs sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Blk718CS. Theoretically the slightliy larger Girodisc should last longer as you need less pad presssure to apply the same braking force and you have better heat dissapation with the larger rotors, so a little less wear and tear and slightly better cooling. Whether this will bring much longer life is yet to be seen!

Whilst the dollar beneifts might not stack up with the Girodisc you are getting a good quality two piece floating rotor with a nice alloy hat. I haven't seen prices for the rotors a lone but from what I've seen for other car makes it looks like they will be around $500 to $600 US per pair to replace the rotors so getting close to the price of the cheaper one piece rotors.

Otherwise for value for money I don't think you will be able to go past the standard size Porsche OEM or Sebro slotted rotors if you need to save some money, but if you are doing 10 track days per year and keeping the car, I think you might as well get the Girodisc.
 

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I've used the Giro Discs with Ferado pads for 15 track events- approx 30 days. Incredible stopping power! My only problem was due to the larger discs, the rear brake wear sensors cannot be used and must be tied to the side. My track inspection missed the wear on the inside of the rotors, and on a track day, the front sensors kicked off a wear warning. By the time that happened, the inside of the rear rotors had scrubbed and worn, necessitating rear rotor replacement. Make sure outside AND inside rear brake pads are checked at track inspection time.
The Giros are much better than OEM rotors and pads- no comparison. Everyone who has ridden with me on track events comments on the incredible braking power. ALSO, if your Porsche dealer is doing the track inspection, when its time for pad replacement, they will require new bolts-they will NOT use the old bolts' - Porsche demands new bolts be used every time pads are replaced, whether OEM or aftermarket pads. All in all, great product and highly recommended!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks bfraz for adding those points. It is sounding like the larger Girodisc Rotors do last longer than OEM rotors for track work. That's also interesting point about the rear wear sensor as my workshop did not mention anything.

I had wondered whether or not Porsche replaces their OEM bolts during pad replacement.

I did not think to measure the bolts that came with the kit but I can see it would be useful to know the size given Porsche is unlikely to have the longer ones at hand. I assume they are some sort of high tensile steel bolt or just mild steel?

Which Ferodo pads did you use? I have used the DS2500 in the past on my heavy Audi and they performed well.
 
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