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For all of you manual 718 GT4 Owners do you find that the gears are too long in your car to really enjoy it on the street? Ride too rough or too compliant? How about the exhaust? What would change about your car to make it more enjoyable? Not that it isn't one of the most amazing drivers cars to begin with....Just curious....

(saying it doesn't shoot flames will automatically disqualify you)

GT4 Long Tube Race Headers Are Here
 

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I think I'll jump in here at the risk of having my head bitten off.

I will admit I don't own either a 981 GT4 or a 718 GT4. I have test driven the 981 version and decided to pass.
I currently own a 987.1 Boxster S MT and a 718 2.5 T4 GTS PDK. I would love to consolidate these cars and get one Porsche and free up garage space. I don't like to "waste" money on cars but my budget is pretty flexible.

My driving is mostly backroad, country driving. I HATE the gearing on the GT4. I've had the discussion ( over and over) about the gearing. Obviously many people don't have this problem and buy the cars. I have decided that much of this comes down to what one considers a backroad. Some back roads are tighter with less visibility than others...those are my backroads...the gearing is a problem because I am often at the top of gear one or the bottom of 2nd on corners. Guys with more sweeping, longer back roads guys seems to shift between 2nd and 3rd. Maybe out West above the tree line. I am mostly in the forests of New England.

I even think the gearing is a bit too long in my 987S.

I know (think?) I could switch gearing. Most of the time I like to buy the right car and not go down the slippery slope of mods.

Other issues I have with the GT4. Too low to the ground. Sure if it is a track only car...fine but for more daily/weekend use, I am not a fan. In fact, when I ordered my GTS, I went with PASM not SPASM. At the time I convinced my self the GTS would be used mostly for DE so I elected to go with PDK but I was still not willing to go with the lower ride height. Finding a double duty car is really like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Sport cars are stiff. That is just something I have learned to accept. The GTS is pretty much as good as it gets with comfort. Never had a complaint. On the other hand, neither the Boxster nor the Cayman are great GT cars, IMO. They aren't great cars on the highway. Adequate but not great. ( we did tour Europe for four weeks in the Cayman...no real complaints and great storage space) But if I lived in LA and did a decent amount of highway driving, I think a 911 would be a better compromise.

Exhaust have always been down on my list of issues, however, I will say I love the exhaust on my TR6. Who doesn't love the sounds of a v12? I never found Porsche to be particularly thrilling exhaust sound. I think the 718 T4 sounds better up until about 4K rpms, old flat 6 better above 4K.

Oh..did I say I hate wings. Love Buffalo wings but not wings on my car.

I know many of my views are in the minority. I have been struggling a good two years trying to swap my two Porsche sports car for one I can really love 100%. Making zero progress. My local driving is probably more fun and better suited for an older, less competent car. Less horsepower, short gears, more flex in the chassis. Old cars that make slow driving feel fast, that's my idea of "street" driving currently. I just don't want to deal with the problems of older mechanical tech. I want a car I am comfortable letting my wife take a couple hundred miles from home.

OK..that's my micro-rant. Modern sports cars are just too big and capable to be much fun on the street anymore. Not just a GT4 issue. Vintage cars are too iffy for a cross country road trip.

(EDIT: And just to be a bit cynical, I don't think the GT4 is a STREET car so should anybody really care if it has shortcomings on the street? The dual purpose thing is probably a pipe dream. Guys on a track probably want a roll bar, aero, stiffness and harness...
I also never bought the marketer/journalist dogma that claim it is a "driver's car" Pretty sure that, on average, Porsche GT cars have considerably less mileage on them than the average off the shelf base or S model. Those are probably the real "driver's cars", IMO.)
 

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I think I'll jump in here at the risk of having my head bitten off.

I will admit I don't own either a 981 GT4 or a 718 GT4. I have test driven the 981 version and decided to pass.
I currently own a 987.1 Boxster S MT and a 718 2.5 T4 GTS PDK. I would love to consolidate these cars and get one Porsche and free up garage space. I don't like to "waste" money on cars but my budget is pretty flexible.

My driving is mostly backroad, country driving. I HATE the gearing on the GT4. I've had the discussion ( over and over) about the gearing. Obviously many people don't have this problem and buy the cars. I have decided that much of this comes down to what one considers a backroad. Some back roads are tighter with less visibility than others...those are my backroads...the gearing is a problem because I am often at the top of gear one or the bottom of 2nd on corners. Guys with more sweeping, longer back roads guys seems to shift between 2nd and 3rd. Maybe out West above the tree line. I am mostly in the forests of New England.

I even think the gearing is a bit too long in my 987S.

I know (think?) I could switch gearing. Most of the time I like to buy the right car and not go down the slippery slope of mods.

Other issues I have with the GT4. Too low to the ground. Sure if it is a track only car...fine but for more daily/weekend use, I am not a fan. In fact, when I ordered my GTS, I went with PASM not SPASM. At the time I convinced my self the GTS would be used mostly for DE so I elected to go with PDK but I was still not willing to go with the lower ride height. Finding a double duty car is really like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Sport cars are stiff. That is just something I have learned to accept. The GTS is pretty much as good as it gets with comfort. Never had a complaint. On the other hand, neither the Boxster nor the Cayman are great GT cars, IMO. They aren't great cars on the highway. Adequate but not great. ( we did tour Europe for four weeks in the Cayman...no real complaints and great storage space) But if I lived in LA and did a decent amount of highway driving, I think a 911 would be a better compromise.

Exhaust have always been down on my list of issues, however, I will say I love the exhaust on my TR6. Who doesn't love the sounds of a v12? I never found Porsche to be particularly thrilling exhaust sound. I think the 718 T4 sounds better up until about 4K rpms, old flat 6 better above 4K.

Oh..did I say I hate wings. Love Buffalo wings but not wings on my car.

I know many of my views are in the minority. I have been struggling a good two years trying to swap my two Porsche sports car for one I can really love 100%. Making zero progress. My local driving is probably more fun and better suited for an older, less competent car. Less horsepower, short gears, more flex in the chassis. Old cars that make slow driving feel fast, that's my idea of "street" driving currently. I just don't want to deal with the problems of older mechanical tech. I want a car I am comfortable letting my wife take a couple hundred miles from home.

OK..that's my micro-rant. Modern sports cars are just too big and capable to be much fun on the street anymore. Not just a GT4 issue. Vintage cars are too iffy for a cross country road trip.

(EDIT: And just to be a bit cynical, I don't think the GT4 is a STREET car so should anybody really care if it has shortcomings on the street? The dual purpose thing is probably a pipe dream. Guys on a track probably want a roll bar, aero, stiffness and harness...
I also never bought the marketer/journalist dogma that claim it is a "driver's car" Pretty sure that, on average, Porsche GT cars have considerably less mileage on them than the average off the shelf base or S model. Those are probably the real "driver's cars", IMO.)

Nice post. I happen to agree on most points. The gearing thing happens because of CAFE concerns and bragging rights on performance numbers.

I totally agree with hating wings. I drive my CGTS (with PASM, not PASMS) daily. I get silver (or other light metallic)/black because it's classic and easy to care for. I run it through a good soft-cloth carwash.

Fixed wings are a non-starter at a car wash. Same with the real low GT4 bodywork.

For a road car, a BMW 4 series or some such would be nicer than a 911. Rear and even mid-engine will never cruise like a front-engined car. I've done several cross country drivess in my Gen 1 Cayman...with GT2 carbon buckets. Seats are surprisingly comfortable and I had a blast, but I've driven a lot of plain cars that were better for highway trips.
If my commute were long, I'd have something else. My US spec E36 M3 was a great highway car before I modded the wee out of it. In fact, probably the best sport/street balance of any car I've driven.

As far as a really entertaining modern street car, Miata is the deal...but no place to put anything!

Light weight and skinny tires? That's the path to fun. One thing I don't like about new 911s is they cover up their absurd weight balance with giant gumball tires in the back (another car wash no-no is 315 rear tires). You get a car that accelerates hard in a straight line and can do a few tricks, but is never really confident or balanced near its really high limits. Anyone can drive them pretty fast. No one can drive them really fast consistently unless they're GT cars. I traded a really well-equipped '19 Carrera T for my '18 Cayman GTS... I don't miss the T.

:alien:
 

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I have a 718 GT4 w/ PASM and race seats, I think the suspension is perfect. The dampening style (not feel) is very much like the PSS-10's on my CaymanS (also PASM). On the GT4 it's much more refined and pleasant. In fact, a couple of folks that I've taken out in the GT4 recently all thought it would ride very rough and were surprised at how nice it was. Some of the roads near me are not in great shape so I have a wide assortment of driving conditions to deal with. For the street/highway, I find the softer setting is perfect. The firmer setting can introduce a little bounce on bumpy pavement and you're not really going to be carving any dramatic turns in those conditions so it's just not necessary. I haven't had a chance to take it to the track yet, but I'm sure I'll find the firmer setting much more applicable there where body roll and setting up for the turns is more crucial.

As for the gearing, I don't understand the complaint that I hear everyone speaking to. Porsche likes first gear to be a "drivable" gear which may throw some folks off and I too had to get used to it. Example: If you do a u-turn and want to accelerate quickly, you'll probably want to shift into first as you go into the turn. Learning to drive manual Japanese and American cars, we were taught to just leave it in 2nd because it was really hard on the synchronizers to push it back into 1st and the gear was so short it just wasn't worth it unless you came to a stop. These Caymans / Boxters have no problem going back into first if you have to slow down and I like it now that I'm used to it.

The only time I struggled with the gearing on my CaymanS (which is similar to the GT4) was at an SCCA track. That track was super-tight and if I wanted to get the most out of it, I would have needed to leave it in 2nd gear, but it was abusive to the car so I hit 3rd for the sweepers and even went into 1st for the tightest turns. That's too much shifting for such a tight course. Between the shifting and slow steering rack, well... Let's just say I was "busy". In contrast, my M3 stayed in 2nd through the whole thing and it was perfect. So for SCCA, yeah I get it!! In fact I was so upset about it, I even wanted to sell the car. That was until finally, I drove it on a very nice, proper race track. Once you do that, the gearing will make perfect sense and you will appreciate how Porsche set it up. Trust me, all those Ford Focus, Miata, and Honda Fit kids that ate your lunch in those parking lot races will be at your mercy on a larger track. Once I get the GT4 out to the track, I suspect it will live in 3rd and 4th through the whole thing. It's really tempting to keep shifting down and let it sing, but these cars handle so well, its better to keep it stable in the turns and focus on keeping momentum through the line (Having a good driving instructor that knows Porsches is a humbling experience).

As for the exhaust. I really love the exhaust note. I would like to hear a little more of it without rolling down the windows. If I modified the exhaust, it would only be to get rid of the GPF and some of the weight. Exhaust preference is very unique to each person so for reference, the "holy grail" of Porsche exhaust (to me) is how the Gen2 GT3-RS performance exhaust sounds. I drove a Gen1 GT3-RS a while back with a nice Fabspeed exhaust set up (catted) and it sounded amazing. That sound totally "fit" that car. I'm very much looking forward to hearing some of the Fabspeed stuff on the GT4.

My only desire for the GT4 is for it to use more of all that displacement. The power level that it's at now is okay, but it would be such an awesome car if it had even 50-75 more hp.
 
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