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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The motive power bleeder makes this so easy to do by yourself.


I have a track day coming up in a few weeks and need some good fluid in the lines plus bleed out any h20 near the calipers.









With ABS and the stability control module, you need more like 20 psi.






 

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I did a nice cleaning of them with the wheels off.
You did a nice cleaning?!? They look brand new - I'd say you did an amazing cleaning. :)

Even the star bolts look perfectly clean - they look black on my car even after cleaning.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE=Optical TDI;119689]Anything special to do for the power bleeder to work? I have the Motive too. Or same simple process as any brake bleed?[/QUOTE]



Are you forcing in from the master cyl. instead of sucking it out from the caliper like on my Mighty Vac?

I am so sorry I've missed these questions previously.


There was nothing special to do to the bleeder as long as you have right adaptor which fits the master cylinder.


All I did was apply pressure at the master cylinder, there was no use of a vacuum at the calipers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also, have a large syringe ready (or turkey baster) at the end of the process as you'll likely overfill the master cylinder and will need to remove some excess brake fluid.
 

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Haven’t done this on the Cayman yet, but on previous cars, after the last caliper is finished, I tip the tank until the internal pickup is sucking air. Then keep bleeding the caliper until the master cylinder reservoir is at the proper level. No turkey baster required.
 

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Waited far too long to get my own Motive bleeder...it's a great addition to any workshop.
 

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Haven’t done this on the Cayman yet, but on previous cars, after the last caliper is finished, I tip the tank until the internal pickup is sucking air. Then keep bleeding the caliper until the master cylinder reservoir is at the proper level. No turkey baster required.

Also just got a Motive Power bleeder, and this is a great idea.
 

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Which Motive Bleeder did you use? I noticed the 0100 European Bleeder and 0109 Black label European Bleeder on their website when filtering by "Porsche".
 

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Which Motive Bleeder did you use? I noticed the 0100 European Bleeder and 0109 Black label European Bleeder on their website when filtering by "Porsche".
Used the #109 model, it comes with an aluminum screw on cap, with a swivel fitting. I also added a air line coupler in the hose.
 
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Performed my first ever brake fluid flush (on any car) yesterday. Very easy task using a pressure bleeder. I spent more time removing the wheels and getting the Cayman up on the 4 jack stands.

I purchased a Motive 0100 bleeder from Amazon, but returned it and purchased the Schawben bleeder from ECS Tuning. I liked the idea that the Schawben has a pressure relief valve, and a swiveling quick disconnect. It did not hurt that ECS Tuning was running a great sale on the bleeder.

I used the dry flush method, 9 PSI of pressure and everything went smoothly except for the spill. :eek: I was filling the brake fluid reservoir when I had a spill. With the reservoir strainer in place, fluid goes in very slowly. Using a funnel I was watching for the reservoir to fill not realizing the funnel was overflowing. :(. Fortunately, no fluid got on the paint, and I had clean cloths and a spray bottle filled with a water/soap solution to clean up any possible spills.

The Flush

There were very few bubbles and the fluid was not discolored. However, I saw small white flakes flowing through the tube as fluid exited the caliper. I observed these flakes at all 4 calipers. There wasn't a lot, but it was noticeable. The flakes were only present when I first opened the bleeder valves.

If you don't mind working on your car this is one of those tasks that leave you with a great sense of satisfaction. I rate the difficulty as 3 on a 10 scale.

Tools:

pressure bleeder
catch bottle(s)
1 liter of brake fluid (possibly 2)
11mm flare nut wrench
spray bottle with soapy water
small blade screwdriver (to remove the rubber bleeder cap)
clean lint-free rags
eye protection
rubber gloves
large towel to protect the fender
 

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Agent 86-

I’m curious as to what value you used to pressurize the tank, and what kind of replacement fluid you used?
 

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Agent 86-

I’m curious as to what value you used to pressurize the tank, and what kind of replacement fluid you used?
Hi Rideguy - I used ATE 706202 Original TYP 200 brake fluid (ATE brake fluids) and pressurized the bleeder tank to 9 psi.
 

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The Motive Bleeder w/ #1109 adapter cap works like a champ!
PCCB Bleeder.JPG
 

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Just replaced all of my brake pads and did a full brake system fluid flush.

I wanted to point out a couple of small things for beginners.

1. You will need about 1,300 ml of brake fluid to completely flush and re-fill the entire system. The picture at the start of this thread shows (3) 500ml bottles which is correct. I bought 2L just to safe (in case i made any bonehead mistakes).

2. You need brake fluid (Motul, Castrol, etc.) with a higher boiling point than the Porsche factory fluid if you will be doing any track or DE work. Maybe for daily driving too if you're a speed demon....lol

There was a 718 Boxster S at the last track event i attended who had a brake system failure because a Porsche dealership's service department claimed they only needed a flush with the fresh Porsche factory brake fluid for the track event.

As the result of that recommendation, the driver became a spectator for the majority of the event.

My guess is that this service department is not allowed to install other brands of brake fluid, and they did not want to lose the business.

Please beware that a dealership's service department may have their own monetary interest at heart and not the safety of the driver, the vehicle, or the other event participants.

For example, I once had a Porsche service department try to convince me to drive in below freezing temperatures using summer tires (against the owner's manual recommendation) because they didn't have the ability to sell me the season appropriate tire type.

I'm done with my venting and ranting now....haha

Cheers!
 

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Here is something many Porsche owners may not know about.

Unlike engine oil, where spending more money for a higher performance oil can very well let you go further between oil changes, this isn't true with brake fluid. For track/racing use you want a fluid with a higher boiling point and that usually means buying a more expensive fluid. Unfortunately the high-boiling-point expensive fluid is MORE prone to absorb moisture and it doesn't matter if you use it for track use or on the street. That means you have to change it more frequently; no problem when racing where you're bleeding/flushing the brake fluid on a regular basis. But it makes for unnecessary work/expense if you are strictly a street driver.

Unless you drive like a maniac on the street, you will be better off with a high quality NON RACING fluid with a lower boiling point. It will absorb less moisture, cost less, and last longer.
 
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