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Are you saying Jeep is will sell a US buyer a new RHD vehicle? This is not allowed in Canada, only 'used' RHD can be registered, all new vehicles must be LHD.
Wranglers can be configured RHD via factory order. They are commonly used by rural mail carriers around here (Southern Ohio).
 

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Wranglers can be configured RHD via factory order. They are commonly used by rural mail carriers around here (Southern Ohio).
Interesting, that makes sense for that kind of vehicle use.

For a C8 (or any other car) I would be surprised that there would be a strong case to support the sale (or need) for both versions(?).
 

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I like the looks of the C8 although I haven't seen one in person. One thing I consistently notice about Vettes is that the wheel/tire combos look small in relation to the car. I know they are not, but they look it to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Are you saying Jeep is will sell a US buyer a new RHD vehicle? This is not allowed in Canada, only 'used' RHD can be registered, all new vehicles must be LHD.
That’s correct, I looked at one a while back. Brand new RHD Jeep sitting on the lot for sale.

Maybe there are requirements I don’t know about?
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Interesting, that makes sense for that kind of vehicle use.

For a C8 (or any other car) I would be surprised that there would be a strong case to support the sale (or need) for both versions(?).
Source

Can you buy right hand drive cars in USA?
It’s probably happened to you before: you pull up next to a car at a traffic light and are shocked to see that no one is sitting in the driver’s seat. When you look more closely, you realize that even though left-hand drive cars are standard in the United States, the driver is sitting on the right side of the vehicle.
Encountering a right-hand drive car raises several questions, like “Can you buy right-hand drive cars in the USA?” And “Can you convert an existing car?” Read on to find out everything you need to know.
Is Driving a Right-hand Drive Car Legal in the USA?
Since they’re non-standard, the legality of driving a right-hand drive car, or RHD, in the United States is probably the first question you have. The short answer to whether or not it’s legal to drive this type of vehicle is yes, it’s perfectly legal.
The postal service is a fantastic example. Receiving mail would be very difficult indeed if right-hand drive cars were illegal because all mail carrier vehicles must be right-hand drive. What’s more, is that anyone can buy them after these vehicles retire from service.
The caveat is that, just like any other car, right-hand vehicles must comply with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards as written in the NHTSA regulations, EPA regulations, and have the proper registration. There are also some limitations on imports, which we’ll talk about shortly.
How to Buy a Right-hand Drive Car in the USA
The simplest way to buy a right-hand drive car in the USA is to buy one that’s factory made. There are a handful of companies that sell factory made right-hand cars; in fact, there are specific models that are only available as RHD in the United States.
The target market for these models is generally postal service workers, but car aficionados will be happy to know that they are also available for purchase by the general public. If you wanted to buy one, you could walk into your Jeep dealership today and drive off with a right-hand drive Jeep Wrangler.
Curious about how much it’ll cost you? A quick online search for the Jeep Wrangler reveals that new car prices range from as low as $20,000 to upwards of $60,000, and this model is just one example. You can use an online car finder to search for companies that sell factory made right-hand cars, where you’ll find both new and used options.
While some of the newer RHD cars can get quite expensive, auto enthusiasts will be pleased to know that they can find plenty of unique options to meet their right-hand drive needs. Used car values in this category can vary greatly, perhaps even more than new cars, and range from as low as $9,000 to up to $95,000.
If you’re thinking about going the secondhand route, vetting a used car is a critical part of the buying process and the reason that you shouldn’t skimp on a vehicle history report. You can complete one with Autocheck before purchase to help ensure that there are no unforeseen issues with your vehicle.
Importing
Though importing may seem like a great way to obtain a RHD car, US law prohibits consumers from importing any vehicle that’s less than 25 years old. Any RHD import you see that’s less than 25 years old is illegal and could be impounded, seized, or destroyed.
While this law does prevent you from obtaining new cars from popular RHD countries like Japan and the United Kingdom, there are still plenty of older models you can import that are fun to own.
Converting Cars from Left to Right-hand
Besides buying or importing a right-hand car, there’s another way to get one of these vehicles: you can convert an existing LHD to RHD. Some people have the time and resources to go this route, and there are two ways to do so.
DIY
Car conversion kits are the most straightforward and most accessible DIY method. They only cost a couple of thousand dollars and achieve the desired effect, but they’re not the best looking way to convert your car.
You can also do a proper conversion by completely taking your car apart, but this method is not for the DIY novice. Converting your vehicle on your own requires you to dismantle the inside of your car entirely, may be time-consuming, and is dangerous if done incorrectly.
Professional
If the thought of taking all the parts out of your car and putting them together again is a formidable one, have no fear. There are a handful of companies dedicated to LHD to RHD conversion.
Professional conversion is the safer, less time-consuming option, but it’s also incredibly expensive. Having this done to your car can cost up to $30,000, so if you paid just a few thousand dollars for a used vehicle, this investment might not be worth it.
Penalties/Fees
As long as the car meets US safety standards and is properly registered, there are no penalties or fees for driving a right-hand drive vehicle.
Driving a RHD in a LHD World
Now that you know a bit more about RHD vehicles, you may be wondering what it’s like to drive on the right side in a LHD world. Having one certainly makes you stand out and is an excellent conversation starter, but are they practical in the US?
All novelty aside, having a RHD car in the United States is mostly impractical. Drivers mention that there are serious safety issues when it comes to things like changing lanes or overtaking other vehicles on two-lane highways. And utilizing drive-up windows like any drive-through lane or trying to pay at tolls is challenging if you’re by yourself.
 

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The C8 is definitely an acquired taste. I don’t care for the looks of the exterior or interior. It could drive like a dream but aesthetically it‘s a train wreck. Just my opinion. Not in my future.
 

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That’s correct, I looked at one a while back. Brand new RHD Jeep sitting on the lot for sale.

Maybe there are requirements I don’t know about?
We have two right hand drive cars. One is a vintage race car so it never sees any street use. Since most race tracks follow a clockwise pattern, there tends to be more right hand turns where RHD is a slight advantage (because it puts the driver's weight on the inside of the turn).
We also have a RHD Lotus Super 7 replica street car that we imported from the UK. Because the car is more than 25 years old, it was no issue. It can be tricky driving a RHD car on US roads. You need to use more care when passing. But driving a 1500 lb car on US roads takes more care in general.

25991

25992
 

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Yep, the wrong side on public roads is wonky. In 1987, spent two months wandering Britain a month and Europe a month. Leased a new Renault (with Paris tags) because we could get it without the VAT for some reason. First month was in England, Scotland and Wales, mostly on B roads, and those country left-hand curves required a little faith of what you would find to get around. The good thing about the Paris tags was that they were red and other drivers would scatter away in front of you! It was a bit confusing at times in Europe. I ended up coming out of an ally in Brussels and found myself in the middle of a wide sidewalk with lots of foot traffic. I'm sitting there trying to figure out the safest and quickest way to get back on the road and a helpful woman comes up to assist. First, obviously, she tried talking to me in French and the only French I know was "Non, ne parle pas francais" (use your imagination), so then she switches to German, which I don't know a little better than French, so I said "Ich spreche se Deutche nicht" (again, use your imagination) and finally, frustrated at this point, she asks, "Do you speak English?" Her English might have better than mine. Which brings up the point that most people in the world know English better than Americans, except for the Brits who point out they knew it first. Big whoop.
 

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I wouldn't choose it over the Cayman or Boxster, but the C8 does look better in person (IMO). Photos seem to lose something the eye see's.
Not having been in the presence of one yet, the car looks better in your photos than it does in the various videos I've seen. Being an architect, my eye is very critical of scale, how lines and components meet and join and how the various parts become a whole. I think the C8 isn't there just yet. It can be, but I don't believe it was refined down to its' essence. The interior? Definitely not. Just look at the real supercars. Forget about the materials, their interiors are very accommodating to both the driver and passenger. Again, not having had the ability to experience the car first hand, that interior is very negative toward the passenger. May as well have place the cockpit in the center and called it a day. Looks very confining for a passenger.
 

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Not having been in the presence of one yet, the car looks better in your photos than it does in the various videos I've seen. Being an architect, my eye is very critical of scale, how lines and components meet and join and how the various parts become a whole. I think the C8 isn't there just yet. It can be, but I don't believe it was refined down to its' essence. The interior? Definitely not. Just look at the real supercars. Forget about the materials, their interiors are very accommodating to both the driver and passenger. Again, not having had the ability to experience the car first hand, that interior is very negative toward the passenger. May as well have place the cockpit in the center and called it a day. Looks very confining for a passenger.
It's pretty edge'y, not as in bold but in a lot of hard edges. And with the colored side blade it looks like a fat rear was grafted onto what could have been a decent looking front end. Once I seen that in my head, I haven't been able to un-see it.
 

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They look better with the body colored side blade option. Why no one selects that is a mystery. On wait, it's because the people buying this car prefer a garish exclamation of its engine placement. This is the chrome wheels of the new generation Vette owner.
 

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Not having been in the presence of one yet, the car looks better in your photos than it does in the various videos I've seen. Being an architect, my eye is very critical of scale, how lines and components meet and join and how the various parts become a whole. I think the C8 isn't there just yet. It can be, but I don't believe it was refined down to its' essence. The interior? Definitely not. Just look at the real supercars. Forget about the materials, their interiors are very accommodating to both the driver and passenger. Again, not having had the ability to experience the car first hand, that interior is very negative toward the passenger. May as well have place the cockpit in the center and called it a day. Looks very confining for a passenger.
I land in your camp on the aesthetics. One of the things that has always attracted me to Porsche designs is their relative simplicity. One could say Porsche adheres to the “form follows function” approach. The C8 is anything but. It appears to have body lines bent everywhere just for the sake of having more body lines. The same could be said for the interior, too.

Regardless, I’m inclined give GM a pass though, just on the basis that they’ve finally done something from the ground up that is truly creative and innovative for the first time in forever.
 

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I just read about this minor design flaw

Not the end of the world obviously. More like a teething problem.
 

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This is so typical.....
LOOK EVERYBODY!! THE DESIGN IS FLAWED!!
More like a very minor assembly issue covered under warranty.....Now, Porsches IMS issue was a design flaw!
 
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