Porsche 718 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I find it interesting the different driving styles of the various posters and am wondering how those translate into the overall health and longevity of the car and engine.

There are those that seem to stay in normal mode, stay below 4K Revs and push to get 30+MPG. Then there are those that red line all day every day. and everything in between.

I myself am in love with my car and find twisty zones, country roads, industrial zones where I can drive and let the car sing to me.
I warm up the oil to 180K every drive and once it hits 180 degrees I have fun.
I am spending 80% of my time above 3K revs and love the 4K to 5K range with frequent visits to the 5K to 6K range. I haven't been redlining but not because I have any issue with it rather I just havent needed to. I am in manual PDK 90% of the time. My fuel consumption as based on miles driven to amount needed to fill the tank is around 19MPG.

I guess my question is firstly do the different driving styles play a part in engine life or longevity of the car and its components. Is someone driving it like they stole it helping or hurting the engine. My gut feeling is that these cars are built to sing and so as long as you warm up the car and service as appropriate that there is no harm to the engine with very spirited driving on a constant basis.
Secondly I am wondering about the fuel consumption. I do not expect to get the same consumption as someone who is sriving at 2k-2.5K revs in normal mode automatic but I guess I was expecting a little bit more than 18MPG. My car has 2500 Miles.

All I can say is that after upgrading from a miata I have never had so much fun in a car and would truly call the boxster the perfected Miata.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
I have the 6M, so I can't speak to the "best" way to drive PDK. Someone here will sooner or later, I'm sure.

My two cents: Don't forget about the gasoline. Good fuel is critical. I use Shell V-power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
Not to be, um, pedantical or anything but 180K is really quite cold, which is -93degC. Unless by 180K you meant 180 x 1000, or even worse, 180 x 1024 (i.e. computerese), on whatever standard thermometer you wish, which would be quite a bit too warm.:giggle:

As for engine life and mileage, giving it time to warm up some before pushing it is wise. You will save wear on rings and bearings if you don't use high rev's except when absolutely necessary, or at least when absolutely desirable. Mileage is improved mostly by keeping speeds down to avoid aero drag and by not over-rev'ing. Otherwise, just drive and enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I try to let oil temp reach +90 Celsius (194 f) before cracking on, but I'm still in the run-in period so I'm not pushing the engine very hard anyway. The first 10 mins of driving will be lower than 3000 revs and using engine braking to help raise oil temp (6MT).

As miles build I fully intend to use the whole range of the tachometer; the engine was designed for it and there's no point babying it (once it's warm). I take the same attitude with my daily drive Honda - no need to redline it everywhere but let it have its head once in a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
LOL yes I guess 180 Kelvin is a little different from 180F. It is the latter I meant. This time of the year in the NE it takes about 7-8 mins of driving to get there but by the winter it will take my entire ride home to get to that temperature which will be a bit of a bummer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
LOL yes I guess 180 Kelvin is a little different from 180F. It is the latter I meant. This time of the year in the NE it takes about 7-8 mins of driving to get there but by the winter it will take my entire ride home to get to that temperature which will be a bit of a bummer.
I've driven mine in the cold, in Pennsylvania. Warms up nicely. Porsche did a very good job metering the coolant to help temps get where they need to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I find it interesting the different driving styles of the various posters and am wondering how those translate into the overall health and longevity of the car and engine.

There are those that seem to stay in normal mode, stay below 4K Revs and push to get 30+MPG. Then there are those that red line all day every day. and everything in between.

I myself am in love with my car and find twisty zones, country roads, industrial zones where I can drive and let the car sing to me.
I warm up the oil to 180K every drive and once it hits 180 degrees I have fun.
I am spending 80% of my time above 3K revs and love the 4K to 5K range with frequent visits to the 5K to 6K range. I haven't been redlining but not because I have any issue with it rather I just havent needed to. I am in manual PDK 90% of the time. My fuel consumption as based on miles driven to amount needed to fill the tank is around 19MPG.

I guess my question is firstly do the different driving styles play a part in engine life or longevity of the car and its components. Is someone driving it like they stole it helping or hurting the engine. My gut feeling is that these cars are built to sing and so as long as you warm up the car and service as appropriate that there is no harm to the engine with very spirited driving on a constant basis.
Secondly I am wondering about the fuel consumption. I do not expect to get the same consumption as someone who is sriving at 2k-2.5K revs in normal mode automatic but I guess I was expecting a little bit more than 18MPG. My car has 2500 Miles.

All I can say is that after upgrading from a miata I have never had so much fun in a car and would truly call the boxster the perfected Miata.
2.5 is wonderful engine. I would deeply regret getting the 2.0 but that is because I track my car and want all the HP I can get. That said, In normal mode, on a flat hwy, on cruise control, at 65mph, I got 32 mpg yesterday. Remember, the biggest complaint about all the caymans before this, was lack of power. They have a wonderful sound but cannot keep up with the 2.5L Turbo, and frankly, the sound of my car on track is blissful and plenty loud (I have been black flagged at Laguna Seca for 94db with my stock engine and exhaust).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
2.5 is wonderful engine. I would deeply regret getting the 2.0 but that is because I track my car and want all the HP I can get.
Not meaning to disagree here at all but so is the 2.0. I don't track mine (my sweetie would kill me if I did) but I absolutely luuuuve my engine, which is the 2.0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,560 Posts
I do drive as i have stolen the car sometimes, it is also my DD and i drive in the winter.
Then i usually track at least 6 weekends per year but due to covid it has been sparse this year.

DD = 30mpg.
Having fun = ~13mpg
Track use = ~11mpg or less
But i dont care how much fuel i have to buy.....

But i do care about maintenence!
2-3 oil changes per year
1-2 brake fluid changes per year.
1-2 air filter changes per year.

I have Never pushed the car before everything is up to temp.
If i have been a hooligan or tracked i ad 10 min of easy driving to let things cool down.

I treating my 986 the same way, closing in on 180000 miles and it still runs without any issues :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
When I go out for a spirited back road drive, it's not unusual for me to keep the car in 2nd, or sometimes 3rd, gear most of the time. I don't mind letting the car hold 4K - 5K RPM in a lower gear between corners at all. I average around 20 MPG with a bit over 5,000 miles on the car.

The way I figure it, these cars are enjoyed best when driven enthusiastically and meticulously maintained.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
2.5 is wonderful engine. I would deeply regret getting the 2.0 but that is because I track my car and want all the HP I can get. That said, In normal mode, on a flat hwy, on cruise control, at 65mph, I got 32 mpg yesterday. Remember, the biggest complaint about all the caymans before this, was lack of power. They have a wonderful sound but cannot keep up with the 2.5L Turbo, and frankly, the sound of my car on track is blissful and plenty loud (I have been black flagged at Laguna Seca for 94db with my stock engine and exhaust).
But here's the thing: A skilled driver with the 2.0 will beat a lesser-skilled driver with the 2.5. Every time.

For your purposes the 2.5 makes sense. Not everyone is you. So please don't disparage those who aren't you by claiming that the 2.0 is a lesser engine that 'cannot keep up with the 2.5L'. It's not the engine; it's the driver - and not all drivers track regularly as you do.

Also: the biggest complaint about Caymans wasn't lack of power. It was lack of USEABLE power. For the street, the 718's engines solve this. For the track, the 981s solved that -- but at the detriment of everyday use-able power. Both you and I (and a whole bunch of other forum members) know that high-revving, peaky engines such as the NA6 are ideally suited for track use. They are not ideally suited for public road use. The 718s engine are, though -- and the difference between the 2.0 and the 2.5 is so miniscule for that use, the only justification for the larger engine is in track use at speeds far above triple digits.

So unless you use Laguna Seca as your daily commute to work, please consider the reasoning of others in choosing which 718 best fits them. They're all magnificent machines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
and the difference between the 2.0 and the 2.5 is so miniscule for that use, the only justification for the larger engine is in track use at speeds far above triple digits.
+1 C&D pretty much said the same thing and validated this fact in their testing of the MT versions of the two engines. Zero (0) to 60 for the 2.5 was 4.3 seconds, 0 to 60 for the 2.0 was 4.4 seconds. Only when you started approaching 100 mph did the 2.5 show it's legs and pull away. Since I don't track anymore at my age, I saved the bucks and went with the 2.0. I can definitely see why you guys that track though, would want the 2.5.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
I didn't read it as a bashing of the 2.0, but rather the NA 6.
Well, @jimmuller and I read it differently. And I've read enough of this forum member's posts to know that he often doesn't think his answers through.

I had no use for the 2.5 when I ordered my car. I also had no use for the NA6 in the 981, which I could have opted for. I opted for the best engine for me, just as some opted for the 2.5 because it was the best engine for them. That doesn't make one worse than another - and as we know, there are plenty who believe the NA6 in the 981 or the 718 is far superior to any blown Porsche powerplant. It just chaps my hide that some believe what works for them automatically makes the alternatives worse for everyone else, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
Fair enough from your perspective I suppose. But saying he chose the 2.5 for more horsepower doesn't make him/her wrong or disrespectful I don't think. It is merely an opinion that we are entitled to here. There is really no sense in getting defensive over which engine configuration one selects because they are all great for whatever purpose you use them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I'm old enough to remember a few things from the distant past. I recall my uncle, who was a car guy, doing his own valve jobs while everyone else went to the Ford dealership to have theirs done. Mileage? Around 40K or so. Spark plugs lasted 3000 miles or less. I also remember that Road and Track magazine used to rate engine longevity by calculating the distance a piston traveled, using stroke, gear ratio, tire circumference, and so on. They translated that into the mileage at which you could expect an engine overhaul.
These days, it's unusual for spark plugs to last less than 100K and used cars regularly sell with more than 200,000 miles on the ODO. In other words, even the cheapest cars are very good and not likely to wear out for a long long time.
So, even though it makes sense to believe that a Porsche, or any other car for that matter, will wear out more quickly if you drive it aggressively, it is not something I think should be cause for concern. Your rpm per mile traveled will by higher than the guy who shifts into top gear as quickly as possible. But chances are you bought a Porsche because you like the enjoyment and thrill of driving a performance vehicle. Given the fact that only a tiny percentage of us keep cars for 10 years or more and given the very long life we can expect from a modern car, it makes no sense to worry about the long term effects of driving in "fun" mode.
In short, have fun.
 

·
Registered
2018 Porsche Cayman GTS and 2014 Porsche Cayman S
Joined
·
11 Posts
Before I bought my first Porsche, I sat down with a service advisor and discussed what I should expect for issues and what I could do to help maintain the car. His response answered both - he sees more issues with Porsches that haven’t been driven spiritedly at least occasionally than the vehicles that are driven hard every day.

I’d say drive it like you want to within the safety of the road and traffic conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
Before I bought my first Porsche, I sat down with a service advisor and discussed what I should expect for issues and what I could do to help maintain the car. His response answered both - he sees more issues with Porsches that haven’t been driven spiritedly at least occasionally than the vehicles that are driven hard every day.

I’d say drive it like you want to within the safety of the road and traffic conditions.
I agree, and used this argument in 2019 with my wife to go to two HPDE weekends! Didn't qualify for Solo yet so couldn't run this year. But still, think about the features on this car. If the engine and suspension aren't taxed on occasion, how many parts are going to suffer from disuse. Ever since reading "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" in the 1970s, I've tried to be aware of the unintended consequences of neglected actions. I'd think I would always be cautious (depending on build date) of a low-mileage Porsche, if I were to buy a used one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Before I bought my first Porsche, I sat down with a service advisor and discussed what I should expect for issues and what I could do to help maintain the car. His response answered both - he sees more issues with Porsches that haven’t been driven spiritedly at least occasionally than the vehicles that are driven hard every day.

I’d say drive it like you want to within the safety of the road and traffic conditions.
40+ track days and latest oil analysis shows engine in good health. Car spends a lot of time at WOT and high in the rev range, no issues.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Ever since reading "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" in the 1970s, I've tried to be aware of the unintended consequences of neglected actions.
One of my favorite novels, bar absolutely none. I've read it several times. An absolute must for anyone with even a passing interest in how things work and how things don't, mechanically and otherwise.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top