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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The PDK on my wife's Macan S will get to 4th gear by about 20 mph. I've driven it many times but never felt the need to use the paddles since it's more of a utilitarian car.
 

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At HPDE's, the PDK in our '17 BS was telepathic in Sport+...always in the correct gear to take advantage of the maximum torque available. IMHO, this is not always true of the PDK in our new BGTS. As best I can remember, the shift points appear the same for both PDK's; however, my butt dyno tells me the turbo had a near linear push after entering each new gear, whereas the 4.0 "push" seems to build after each gear change...YMMV.

The bottom line is I never used the paddles in our turbo BS, but it seems to necessary at times in our BGTS 4.0. Sound is secondary for me. Honestly, I miss the turbo.

Out on the road, I always use Sport with the paddles, although no paddles on the interstate when when just luffing along.
 

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I let the PDK handle shifting in my base Cayman except during spirited driving on winding roads. When attacking curves on a twisting road I used the paddles.......it's just more fun for me that way.

The only time I run the PDK in normal mode is if I am on the interstate which is not often. Otherwise, it is always in sport mode.
 

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I use the paddles all the time in Sport.

The PDK is other worldly in doing all the right things in Sport+

Downshifting for a corner to compression brake is where I paddle shift the most.
 

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In my 2.0L Cayman I use the paddles every so often, usually when I want a single downshift to accelerate. In non-Sport Mode the PDK shift points are quite low rpm, which is fine for extended highway running. In Sport Mode they are higher and better suited to here-and-there driving. A sudden depression of the accelerator make the PDK downshift but sometimes it goes two gears when I'd be happy with just one. Occasionally I have paddled into 7th on a highway when the PDK was staying in 6th. Mostly I am happy to let the PDK shift for itself.

Those paddles rotate with the steering wheel so that they are always at your fingers as you turn the wheel. Of course that is obvious.
 

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Coming from a Ferrari I suppose you'd grow accustomed to using column-mounted paddles... and I can see how in a street car that could be beneficial as I've found myself dropping down to the console lever if I'm in a roundabout or doing a u-turn or something where the steering wheel is at an extreme angle to use the paddles.

But I'll go ahead and stop you from suggesting wheel-mounted paddles are "not at all functional". Actual racing drivers don't seem to think they're not functional. I'm no expert but it seems rare to find an actual racing car with column-mounted paddles.

On a street car with PDK however, they're just there if you want to use them.

Just glancing at a couple on-board Nurburgring videos, it seems even Porsche factory drivers aren't in agreement on using the paddles or not.
 

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Those paddles rotate with the steering wheel so that they are always at your fingers as you turn the wheel. Of course that is obvious.
When you do a greater than 90 degree turn or 180 u-turn?

On those occasions, I feel like I am in no man's land for street driving. I either have to shift into 2nd prior to getting very far into the turn (very low rpms) or I'm pushing into the higher revs before my paddles and hands are back "in synch". Granted, it doesn't happen often but much more frequent in places I daily drive (NE urban). But maybe I'm alone in this area as I like Sport+ manual for more linear throttle response. I also have a very limited "Sport Driver's Education". Some day🤞🤞🤞.
 

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When you do a greater than 90 degree turn or 180 u-turn?

On those occasions, I feel like I am in no man's land for street driving. I either have to shift into 2nd prior to getting very far into the turn (very low rpms) or I'm pushing into the higher revs before my paddles and hands are back "in synch". Granted, it doesn't happen often but much more frequent in places I daily drive (NE urban). But maybe I'm alone in this area as I like Sport+ manual for more linear throttle response. I also have a very limited "Sport Driver's Education". Some day🤞🤞🤞.
Use the console shifter just like you'd do in a manual.

In fact sometimes I just use that and forget about the paddles... now that Porsche corrected the lever to the correct + and - positions...
 

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Use the console shifter just like you'd do in a manual.

In fact sometimes I just use that and forget about the paddles... now that Porsche corrected the lever to the correct + and - positions...
Yeah, my previous post in this thread said it is one time that I use the console shifter. I was just responding to the idea that someone's hands and paddles are always aligned.

I sometimes use the console shifter also. Kinda gives a "manual" feel to the PDK without bothering my bum left knee.
 

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But I'll go ahead and stop you from suggesting wheel-mounted paddles are "not at all functional". Actual racing drivers don't seem to think they're not functional. I'm no expert but it seems rare to find an actual racing car with column-mounted paddles.
From all the F1 cockpit footage that I've seen, the steering wheel only turns 180 degree lock to lock, so there is no need to have column mounted paddles as both hands are always in contact with the steering wheel.

For our street cars, wheel-mounted paddles are so annoying when you have to do a sharp turn.
 

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IMO the PDK does an excellent job in most cases and for learning to drive fast on the track or other technical courses it allows you to focus on the road and driving technique. For mountain style roads there are some stituations like hair-pin switch backs where I change down manually to a lower gear. On the track I've progressed to using the paddle shifts as there are some points on the tack that the shift points are in the wrong place which can comprimise traction or are a gear lower than what I want to go, which again can comprimise traction, especially in the wet, but in the dry it is really only one or two corners that I really need to manually shift.
 
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