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The biggest adjustment for me when I first got my MT 718CS is how fast it wants to go from a start in first gear. There were many times when I'd pull away form a stop and have to apply the brake to avoid hitting the car in front. Now I let the car in front pull away a bit before getting going. I'm easily right behind them in a second or so, and this is moving at just 15 mph. Most other cars and drivers pull away incrediblty slowly from a stop. I find the MT doesn't like moving slower than 15 mph.
 

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I rev mine to 6K rpm to hear the engine then let it out slow. JUST KIDDING. it is tough. I have stalled mine twice and have owned 12 Manual Porsches...
 

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I've stalled ours 3 times in 13 months of ownership, each time after a long drive followed by a short cool off period. Frustrating as those times it just didn't jump like I was expecting and used to. It basically just bogged down. I don't think it was me but it's always possible!?
 

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Speaking of stalling, is it known that simultaneously pushing in the clutch and pressing the brake pedal will instantly restart the engine if you stall it? My daily driver has continuously had a manual transmission since starting with a 1974 Datsun 260Z and I still stall every once in a while. I was told about this nice little restart feature at the Atlanta PEC. It makes for an almost seamless but fast restart so it is not obvious to most passengers.
 

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I rev mine to 6K rpm to hear the engine then let it out slow. JUST KIDDING. it is tough. I have stalled mine twice and have owned 12 Manual Porsches...
You're doing it wrong.. You should rev to 6K then dump the clutch as fast as possible! Hopefully leaving half your tires behind you as well. :)
 

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Speaking of stalling, is it known that simultaneously pushing in the clutch and pressing the brake pedal will instantly restart the engine if you stall it? My daily driver has continuously had a manual transmission since starting with a 1974 Datsun 260Z and I still stall every once in a while. I was told about this nice little restart feature at the Atlanta PEC. It makes the restart so fast and seamless it is not obvious to most passengers.
And yes, this does work. It's quick but not quite seamless!
 

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I am not mechanically savvy, but in the olden days, sportscars of high horsepower had a very hard clutch spring and limited engagement range. I assume that this was to protect the clutch from wear, if the driver feathered the clutch with all that horsepower.

My worst experience was with a friend's Nissan 370Z. He let me drive it (3 days old) and the engine died on me 4 times! Fifth time you could smell the burning clutch all the way to the next village.

I don't think modern cars need that stiff and short engagement range clutch. At least my Mustang GT (420 HP) didn't...
 

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Ok Ok - Youre right! - I changed the wording using "almost". But, if the passenger doesnt notice it, in the spirit of avoiding being embarrassed and hearing "did you just learn to drive a stick?" then is it is virtually seamless.
Or you can just say "Gotta love that auto start stop feature for saving gas". :p
 

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just keep practicing stop and go driving somewhere you feel comfortable. :p

I learned to drive a 3 speed stick on the floor in a Willys Jeep in my parents Orange grove when I was 8 (I'm 68). My new 718 is the only car I have ever driven with an automatic transmission that I adore. Shifts faster than a F1. I would rather have a 718 than 2020 C8.
 

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My 6MT Cayman seems to have a low level of cycling rev between 900-1100 RPM, and that seems to play into this uncertainty of stalling when coasting down on neutral in low speed rolling. I almost have to slow down by braking enough to shift into first gear, and second gear seems to be too slow and risks stalling without giving more gas. I am still learning to be smooth at that awkward juncture.

in my 5MT Honda Element, I could do second gear without any concern of stalling.
 

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I think I read it here, and it seems to work for me, if you stall while starting to move in first gear, if you clutch and floor the accelerator pedal three times in quick succession, it will start.
 

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I think I read it here, and it seems to work for me, if you stall while starting to move in first gear, if you clutch and floor the accelerator pedal three times in quick succession, it will start.
Just push the clutch in with foot on the brake and it starts right up. You may need to be in gear, I don't know. The car has restarted each of the times I've managed to stall it before I could even reach for the key. It's really nice to hear the engine restart on its own even though it's frustrating as **** to stall it. I've driven a stick long enough (46 years but with a couple years off) to know how to get the car off the line. Maybe it's old age though!!? Nah!!?
 

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I feel that the safest way to learn how to operate a specific clutch is by starting and stopping without using the gas pedal.
Starting and stopping at idle rpm let you focus on the clutch alone.
This is fantastic advice ... and it's really the only way to learn it on a motorcycle, because if you don't do well modulating the throttle before you have a good feel for the clutch lever's engagement range, well ... you're on your ass, and your bike is either in front of you on its side or on top of one of your legs.

OP: Despite the boxer-four similarity, the 718 is a much, much, much different car than a BRZ. If you still have the BRZ, drive it -- and practice in the 718 in a parking lot until you have it down. Once you've got the hang of the 718's differences, you'll find that cars like the BRZ feel like fluffy featherweight toys. Trust me: that payoff that feeling produces is awesome. Just be patient.
 

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When I got my 718 Cayman Base Manual, I had similar anxiety. My anxiety was from a few sources:
  • The Cayman is an expensive car. It was twice as much as my previous car, an Acura TL.
  • I had driven a 944 manual for 20 years, which ended in 2006. The new clutch was very different that my experience. And, I was out of date on driving manuals.
  • The Cayman lurches and stalls easily. Regardless of other's experiences, I find the Cayman is built to pop of the line without slamming you in your seat. This is scary in traffic.
  • Stop and go freeway traffic experience was horrible.
I got over this with a series of activities.
  • I stayed off the freeways until I was comfortable with regular local traffic
  • I drove slowly around my neighborhood. The speed limit is about 15 in most places in our neighborhood. So, driving slowly wasn't a problem. In fact, it helped reinforce my habit on driving slowly in my neighborhood.
  • I found a piece of highway to practice fast starts. Fortunately, that was not hard to find near me. This helped me dramatically get accustomed to the various different dead stop-starts by my Cayman.
  • I stalled a lot. I forced stalled. I clumsy stalled. I made myself build up muscle memory to react unconsciously react to a stall and get moving with no drama. Having the Auto Stop override button turned on helps greatly. When the car is nearly stopped, the engine automatically restarts. It's a neat trick when you get use to it.
  • As I got more comfortable with the car, I experienced full acceleration in the first 4 four gears. Still, 3rd and 4th will likely make you go too fast. Still, allow yourself to feel the car accelerate all the way to 6,500 RPM. You will likely max out over 7,000 as you shift. Do this repeatedly with 1st and 2nd gear, and 3rd where possible. You will get the feel of the acceleration behavior of your car. The car really kicks in after 4,000, but the acceleration is very smooth throughout the RPM range. You will also learn when to shift during acceleration. I find this one of the best features of the car.
  • Alternatively, practice downshifting at speed. This will also give you more experience with your clutch and car performance. I recommend practicing downshifting from 4th to 3rd, and then 2nd. I have found the car dislikes downshifting to 1st.
  • The more comfortable you become with the car, the more you should take it on the freeway and windy backroads. The car has a lot to offer once you are comfortable with it.
  • After a few months, you will forget how how expensive your car was. You will never totally forget, but this anxiety fades with comfort with the car. Sadly, your car is depreciating as you read this. It's best not to get too obsessed about it. Still, treat the car with care, as it is an expensive, finely tuned machine.
  • If your car starts jerking more than normal after a while, it likely needs new oil or other service(s). Eventually, you will be able to tell the difference between an incident and deteriorating car performance.
Hopeful this helps. Enjoy your new ride!

--Mark
 

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My 6MT Cayman seems to have a low level of cycling rev between 900-1100 RPM, and that seems to play into this uncertainty of stalling when coasting down on neutral in low speed rolling. I almost have to slow down by braking enough to shift into first gear, and second gear seems to be too slow and risks stalling without giving more gas. I am still learning to be smooth at that awkward juncture.

in my 5MT Honda Element, I could do second gear without any concern of stalling.
If you blip the throttle on the shift into first from second it will be much easier to get into first gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
When I got my 718 Cayman Base Manual, I had similar anxiety. My anxiety was from a few sources:
  • The Cayman is an expensive car. It was twice as much as my previous car, an Acura TL.
  • I had driven a 944 manual for 20 years, which ended in 2006. The new clutch was very different that my experience. And, I was out of date on driving manuals.
  • The Cayman lurches and stalls easily. Regardless of other's experiences, I find the Cayman is built to pop of the line without slamming you in your seat. This is scary in traffic.
  • Stop and go freeway traffic experience was horrible.
I got over this with a series of activities.
  • I stayed off the freeways until I was comfortable with regular local traffic
  • I drove slowly around my neighborhood. The speed limit is about 15 in most places in our neighborhood. So, driving slowly wasn't a problem. In fact, it helped reinforce my habit on driving slowly in my neighborhood.
  • I found a piece of highway to practice fast starts. Fortunately, that was not hard to find near me. This helped me dramatically get accustomed to the various different dead stop-starts by my Cayman.
  • I stalled a lot. I forced stalled. I clumsy stalled. I made myself build up muscle memory to react unconsciously react to a stall and get moving with no drama. Having the Auto Stop override button turned on helps greatly. When the car is nearly stopped, the engine automatically restarts. It's a neat trick when you get use to it.
  • As I got more comfortable with the car, I experienced full acceleration in the first 4 four gears. Still, 3rd and 4th will likely make you go too fast. Still, allow yourself to feel the car accelerate all the way to 6,500 RPM. You will likely max out over 7,000 as you shift. Do this repeatedly with 1st and 2nd gear, and 3rd where possible. You will get the feel of the acceleration behavior of your car. The car really kicks in after 4,000, but the acceleration is very smooth throughout the RPM range. You will also learn when to shift during acceleration. I find this one of the best features of the car.
  • Alternatively, practice downshifting at speed. This will also give you more experience with your clutch and car performance. I recommend practicing downshifting from 4th to 3rd, and then 2nd. I have found the car dislikes downshifting to 1st.
  • The more comfortable you become with the car, the more you should take it on the freeway and windy backroads. The car has a lot to offer once you are comfortable with it.
  • After a few months, you will forget how how expensive your car was. You will never totally forget, but this anxiety fades with comfort with the car. Sadly, your car is depreciating as you read this. It's best not to get too obsessed about it. Still, treat the car with care, as it is an expensive, finely tuned machine.
  • If your car starts jerking more than normal after a while, it likely needs new oil or other service(s). Eventually, you will be able to tell the difference between an incident and deteriorating car performance.
Hopeful this helps. Enjoy your new ride!

--Mark
Thank you so much for sharing your experience, Mark!
Yes, Cayman is expensive car. It was more than twice as well. It's been 3 weeks since I picked up brand new but I still cannot relax...not relaxing means my body move is not smooth thus it cause stalls. I started to drive every night after work near my house for the purpose of getting used to be. I stopped listening music to focus practices. For sure, listening exhaust sounds instead of listening music result in improved though I still watching tacho. I get a little panic when engine automatically starts after stall. The panic cause multiple stalls. Now, I feel most important thing is relaxing by getting used to be with Cayman.
 
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