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...listening exhaust sounds instead of listening music result in improved though I still watching tacho. I get a little panic when engine automatically starts after stall...
Yes, switch off the Radio and the Automatic Start (A) Button. They are distractions. The Tach is just another distraction. Get your scissors, cut a 4" circle and tape it over the Tach.

As an alternative, get someone in the passenger seat as a spotter, close your eyes and let out the clutch. Some would call this a dangerous Clutch Therapy. The Empty Parking Lot Rule applies here. Make sure there are no other distractions, such as small animals scurrying about, children screaming, pedestrian malls, etc.
 

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I'm going to suggest that you just listen to the engine. Keep the revs high enough by sound as you let the clutch out so it doesn't stall. Don't worry at this time about anything except getting rolling. As the engine revs drop give more gas.
It's a dance that will become second nature once comfortable. Remember that this all happens over 1 or 2 seconds most so it's a quick dance.
 

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I’m glad I found this thread big help

just took deliveryou a 21 base cayman and have had the same experience as Catcayman. despite years of experience with gti brz, honda type R, 3 series, 5 series, wrx all of which were easier to get the hang of

feeling sheepish at my trouble starting in first without jumps and jolts.

given all this guidance I’m confident I can improve
 

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My base manual Boxster is difficult to get moving on a hill. I may set the record at 66 years for number of years driving a manual so do have some experience with the process. Have had the car for 3 years and still have difficulty at times. Think the reason is simply the Boxster first gear ratio is not numerically high enough. Have never had any difficulty with all the previous manual transmission cars and trucks.

The other issue with the gearbox is the spring load forcing the downshift from 6th to 3rd. I prefer to decide what gear I want to select. Do not always remember to keep side pressure on the stick to prevent the 6th to 3rd downshift.
 

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I also have a 718 Cayman Base with a manual transmission. I will agree and disagree with some of the advise given. Here's my 50+ years of experience with a clutch, for what it's worth. If your previous ride had a light flywheel and was low on low-end torque, you needed to apply throttle first, then release the clutch to keep from killing the engine. The base 718 does not have a lot of torque at idle, but has plenty enough. I have a 40 minute commute into work each day with a lot of start/stop/clutch in and out traffic. Here's what I suggest:

-Find an empty flat parking lot as recommended above. Pointing slightly downhill will make the exercise easier.
-Porsche says to adjust your seat so your left knee isn't straight, but is still slightly bent when you have the clutch pedal to the floor.
-Put it in Sport mode. The engine idles at about 900 in normal mode, but about 1,000 in Sport. The slight increase in RPM will help a bit in the learning curve.
-Don't look at the gauges.
-Let out the clutch slowly until you feel the clutch plate just start to engage. The engine sound will change, and with my poor hearing is easier to appreciate in Sport mode. (I don't recommend looking at the tach, but if you insist you'll see the RPMs drop just a little as the clutch engages.)
-Slowly let out the clutch and you're off and running. At this point you can give it some gas. But, do it by feel, not the gauges
-If you're on an upward incline, you'll have to give it a bit of gas as you let out the clutch fully.
-Go and shift them gears.
Throttle response is more sensitive in Sport mode. Not sure that would be helpful.
 

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just keep practicing stop and go driving somewhere you feel comfortable. :p

I learned to drive a 3 speed stick on the floor in a Willys Jeep in my parents Orange grove when I was 8 (I'm 68). My new 718 is the only car I have ever driven with an automatic transmission that I adore. Shifts faster than a F1. I would rather have a 718 than 2020 C8.
I have a C8 and a 718 and I fully agree with you. The 718 is just plain precision fun.
 

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My base manual Boxster is difficult to get moving on a hill. I may set the record at 66 years for number of years driving a manual so do have some experience with the process. Have had the car for 3 years and still have difficulty at times. Think the reason is simply the Boxster first gear ratio is not numerically high enough. Have never had any difficulty with all the previous manual transmission cars and trucks.

The other issue with the gearbox is the spring load forcing the downshift from 6th to 3rd. I prefer to decide what gear I want to select. Do not always remember to keep side pressure on the stick to prevent the 6th to 3rd downshift.
T
 

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When I got my 718 Cayman Base Manual, I had similar anxiety. My anxiety was from a few sources:
  • The Cayman is an expensive car. It was twice as much as my previous car, an Acura TL.
  • I had driven a 944 manual for 20 years, which ended in 2006. The new clutch was very different that my experience. And, I was out of date on driving manuals.
  • The Cayman lurches and stalls easily. Regardless of other's experiences, I find the Cayman is built to pop of the line without slamming you in your seat. This is scary in traffic.
  • Stop and go freeway traffic experience was horrible.
I got over this with a series of activities.
  • I stayed off the freeways until I was comfortable with regular local traffic
  • I drove slowly around my neighborhood. The speed limit is about 15 in most places in our neighborhood. So, driving slowly wasn't a problem. In fact, it helped reinforce my habit on driving slowly in my neighborhood.
  • I found a piece of highway to practice fast starts. Fortunately, that was not hard to find near me. This helped me dramatically get accustomed to the various different dead stop-starts by my Cayman.
  • I stalled a lot. I forced stalled. I clumsy stalled. I made myself build up muscle memory to react unconsciously react to a stall and get moving with no drama. Having the Auto Stop override button turned on helps greatly. When the car is nearly stopped, the engine automatically restarts. It's a neat trick when you get use to it.
  • As I got more comfortable with the car, I experienced full acceleration in the first 4 four gears. Still, 3rd and 4th will likely make you go too fast. Still, allow yourself to feel the car accelerate all the way to 6,500 RPM. You will likely max out over 7,000 as you shift. Do this repeatedly with 1st and 2nd gear, and 3rd where possible. You will get the feel of the acceleration behavior of your car. The car really kicks in after 4,000, but the acceleration is very smooth throughout the RPM range. You will also learn when to shift during acceleration. I find this one of the best features of the car.
  • Alternatively, practice downshifting at speed. This will also give you more experience with your clutch and car performance. I recommend practicing downshifting from 4th to 3rd, and then 2nd. I have found the car dislikes downshifting to 1st.
  • The more comfortable you become with the car, the more you should take it on the freeway and windy backroads. The car has a lot to offer once you are comfortable with it.
  • After a few months, you will forget how how expensive your car was. You will never totally forget, but this anxiety fades with comfort with the car. Sadly, your car is depreciating as you read this. It's best not to get too obsessed about it. Still, treat the car with care, as it is an expensive, finely tuned machine.
  • If your car starts jerking more than normal after a while, it likely needs new oil or other service(s). Eventually, you will be able to tell the difference between an incident and deteriorating car performance.
Hopeful this helps. Enjoy your new ride!

--Mark
I'm kicking up an old thread, but I seriously appreciate this post, specifically related to it being expensive. Just got my Cayman and there's been quite a lot of anxiety as it is literally worth 3.5x as much as my previous car. Hoping that anxiety will fall away as I get used to living with and driving it.
 

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As I commented on in other threads, no one ever has or would suggest I win an award for smooth slick shifting even though I have had a manual transmission since 1974. So the advice to follow is not coming from someone who is an expert at which he is giving the advice. Nevertheless, I shift the best, even pretty **** good, when I am not at all focused or even thinking about shifting. If the light changes to green, and my mind is focused elsewhere, or even lost thoughtless in some black hole, my shifts are pretty smooth. When I think about or focus on shifting my shifts do not represent anything I would be proud of.

My girl friend equivalent wife likes me to shift smoothly; a Buick Dynaflow type of experience. To do so, an obvious necessity now, means, at least for me, feathering out the clutch with more throttle. This is very effective but certainly means more wear on the clutch. But, again as I commented elsewhere, the cost of replacing the clutch sooner is much less than the cost of the brain damage from not shifting like a Buick Dynaflow.
 

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Perhaps this has been considered already, but I wonder of the OP's problem has more to do with worry about driving a really expansive car than with the clutch per se. Sure, mismanaging a manual clutch can be one way to screw up, but screwing up an econobox is different from screwing up a Porsche (of any variety). The 718 is quite forgiving and robust, so OP don't worry about it! The first itme I drove my car to my office I had to drive home in a Biblical deluge T-storm. I WORRIED about those big tires and all that monstrous torque. When I became more familiar with the car my worry diminished. Just give it time and enjoy the learning process.
 

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The biggest adjustment for me when I first got my MT 718CS is how fast it wants to go from a start in first gear. There were many times when I'd pull away form a stop and have to apply the brake to avoid hitting the car in front. Now I let the car in front pull away a bit before getting going. I'm easily right behind them in a second or so, and this is moving at just 15 mph. Most other cars and drivers pull away incrediblty slowly from a stop. I find the MT doesn't like moving slower than 15 mph.
If this happening, you are using too much throttle from rest.
 

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It's been 2 weeks since I picked up my brand new base 718 cayman with manual transmission. I'm still scared stop and go...

I've been driving manual transmission for 10 years, all of the car were low power natural engine (no turbo).
I usually connect clutch around 2000rpm, then car start moving slowly. No issue at all.

However, when I do same thing in my 718 cayman, car start very fast since 2000rpm is maximum torque!! I'm so scared.
I also tried to connect clutch around 1000rpm, then engine stops very easily.
Best thing might be connecting clutch around 1500rpm. But, this is not easy though I'm trying to press pedal slowly...

I bought cayman for my daily car. I need to overcome my issue.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
I just got my mt cayman and I’ve stalled probably 10x in 3 days lol. However, what’s so nice is the car is very polite. It waits about 2 seconds and then gently restarts on it’s own, and I could swear I hear it murmuring “that’s just fine, don’t worry about… blub, blub, blub.”

And off we go!

I do agree it is a little hairy to be in traffic and I don’t enjoy it. The car wants to be given gas and driven. But, you can mitigate this by very gently easing the clutch out. I’ve already gotten rather good at it, but in my mind I feel the car absolutely hates this method of entering 1st gear and really wishes I’d feed it lol.

in all seriousness though, one solution is to give yourself a few car lengths before you take off from behind someone. That way you can launch correctly in 1st, at a decent clip, around 2k rpm, and have enough roadway to settle down before you inevitably have to stop again.

personally, I’m not going to be driving this car in rush hour traffic. It’s just not enjoyable to me. I do have work and focus to not stall it in the constant stop/go.
 

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One way to get going is to blip the throttle and as the RPMs descend ease out on the clutch. That’s one way to get going. Just throwing out a suggestion. But a bit of time in a deserted parking lot will help tremendously.
i like this method and I find that I do better and get into first smoothly and more consistently if I blip it and then watch the rpm’s for when to ease off the clutch.

On the other hand… you can maneuver into first in this car without any throttle at all. It’s very slow, but also very good for heavy traffic.
 

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It's quite interesting reading this thread. I haven't driven a manual 718, but have driven lots of manual Porsches, manual turbo cars, etc., and generally, except in the cases of objectively tricky cars, not had too much bother.

I wonder if it is something to do with mindset and experience. In the UK, 98% of drivers will learn and pass their test in a manual - otherwise you get an auto only license. Generally speaking, to most people "manual" has no sporting connotations - it's just the standard basic gearbox. So people just get in a manual and roll around in it with no great expectations. If you're buying a very expensive Porsche as your first manual for that engagement/sportiness, from the start you're tense and set up for problems. They've also had a lot of experience with low power and spongy clutches to get practice.

I had this just changing 1-2 and 2-3 in a particular car. Could not get it smooth. More I focussed, the worse it was. It wasn't my car, and my friend nailed it everytime, just driving along chatting. Took me ages to work out that it needed a very precise footwork on the clutch and throttle to get it, which he had just got "subconsciously"

My advice would be to try to relax (worst advice ever - relax goddamnit!!!). But at the same time practice. Any modern manual should allow you to set off as gently as you like. In almost all circumstances, you should be able to set off quick enough without going over ~12-1400 RPM before the clutch is fully engaged. But at the same time, watching RPM should be avoided, its something best controlled by feel and sound
 

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This might sound silly but I honestly believe that the right shoes makes a huge difference. Around the house I wear some rather large sneakers with a gummy soles. If I forget and don't change to a pair of driving shoes the shifting experience is terrible.
 

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This might sound silly but I honestly believe that the right shoes makes a huge difference. Around the house I wear some rather large sneakers with a gummy soles. If I forget and don't change to a pair of driving shoes the shifting experience is terrible.
true for sure.
I can’t drive in boots.
I drive in a pair of Adidas Mundial Goal, indoor soccer shoes (well, football if you’re English.)

Never had a pair of driving shoes per se, but any thinly soled shoe should help. In America, our lively congresspeople from CA are attempting to ban Kangaroo leather so I had to buy a few pairs which will hopefully last me until I’m too old to drive lol.

The mundial, while great shoes for driving imo, are also very comfortable, win/win!
 

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true for sure.
I can’t drive in boots.
I drive in a pair of Adidas Mundial Goal, indoor soccer shoes (well, football if you’re English.)

Never had a pair of driving shoes per se, but any thinly soled shoe should help. In America, our lively congresspeople from CA are attempting to ban Kangaroo leather so I had to buy a few pairs which will hopefully last me until I’m too old to drive lol.

The mundial, while great shoes for driving imo, are also very comfortable, win/win!
I might be tempted to do the same if those were my favorite "driving" shoes. All the hockey skates I wore up through high school were made of Kangaroo leather, which was tremendously durable and quite comfortable to boot (pun intended :rolleyes:).
 
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