Porsche 718 Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got some winter wheels from Tire Rack from their list of wheels that fit the 718 and tried putting them on the car today. Has anyone else changed wheels themselves yet? How difficult should it be? On my 987 the old wheel slides off and the new on slides on (using wheel hangers). On the 718 the axle has three curved sections which stick out a bit and I suppose these fit just inside the hug of the wheel. The existing wheels fit very snugly on these. I was not able to get the new ones on though. The manual says you should use grease on these three sections - perhaps that helps? But how tight is the fit supposed to be?

So in the end I put the original wheel back on and gave up trying to get the new wheels on.

Any tips?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I bought some Forgestars and had no problems at all fitting them on. It should not be that tight. I would contact TR and see what they say. You could also take a good caliper and measure the ID of the wheel center as well as the OD of the 3 axle tabs and compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I sent an email to Tire Rack. Haven't heard back yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
You might have some luck messaging them on their Facebook page. Some companies go where customers are likely to be and social media is it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have been in contact with Tire Rack. They say the wheels should fit.

I did manage to get the rear wheels to fit. It seems the tolerances around the three tabs on the axle is tiny. Even the Porsche wheels that came on the car were very tightly fitted to the axle. The manual does say you should lightly grease the tabs when mounting the wheels. So I ordered some grease from Pelican Parts. It should arrive later this week. I'll then try again on the fronts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I managed to get the wheels to fit properly. The solution (for me anyway) was to use very fine sand paper (400) on the three tabs to clean them up and then apply a very small amount of the grease recommended by Porsche in the manual (which I got from Pelican Parts). This allowed to wheel to fit on fairly easily. So all is good now.

As winter is not here yet I put the summer wheels back on after giving them a thorough cleaning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Also - after removing the rear wheels I found a ton of pebbles on the suspension components. They have vertical edges that allow the pebbles to be caught on top of the horizontal arms. I could have made a small beach out of all the debris! Using a shop vac cleaned it all up. But it was quite amazing how much was there.
 

·
Guest
Joined
·
892 Posts
Also - after removing the rear wheels I found a ton of pebbles on the suspension components. They have vertical edges that allow the pebbles to be caught on top of the horizontal arms. I could have made a small beach out of all the debris! Using a shop vac cleaned it all up. But it was quite amazing how much was there.
In a previous post I referred to the awful system they use for re-surfacing many roads where I live. This consists of throwing stones on a bitumen layer, running a roller over it once & then leaving the cars to mostly flatten it. Eventually they come back to sweep it but not before it causes major damage to vehicles. As I said at the time I only got caught badly once. That's because if I spot it early enough then I do a U-turn & take another route. The attached thumb nail shows what gravel was stuck in my car (a full 27 ounces of it from my old 981). The bulk of it collected on the horizontal arms as you said & works its way into every nook & cranny from there (lousy design by the way as the lips on the arms stop the gravel falling off again). I can pretty much guarantee that if you had any amount of it then even if you cleaned the arms you'll find more after you take the car for a quick spin. I was pulling it out for days, but then in my case the gravel had even managed to find it's way into vehicle body parts such as the rear bumper??? Don't ask me how but the Porsche centre removed that for me.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
Yeah, that method is called a "chip seal" - it's very durable and cheap to perform but extremely annoying until it's compacted and then swept.
 

·
Guest
Joined
·
892 Posts
Yeah, that method is called a "chip seal" - it's very durable and cheap to perform but extremely annoying until it's compacted and then swept.
Well if you ever have to drive over even a small section of it that's been newly laid then make sure you check those suspension arms. When you think you've cleared the gravel, take a short drive & check again, then repeat the process multiple times. What happens is the gravel sits on top of the arms which fairly effectively form trays, then some of it gets lodged out of reach & sight at the top of the arms during driving. You think you've cleared it but it's amazing just how much of it there can still be. If you have access to a lift it will probably make retrieving it easier but still not much fun. It's worth checking those arms on a fairly regular basis anyway. As for driving on that surface on a motorcycle, it's just darn right dangerous until it's been down for a while. You're reduced to a crawl & at the mercy of any idiot that chooses not to slow down appropriately & there are far too many (same with a car & that's where you'll normally get a chipped windscreen or paint from). The surface is also very abrasive even when settled. Coming off a bike & sliding down the road is never something you wish to experience but sliding on this surface will be similar to sliding along a cheese grater. I came across a serious motorcycle accident on this stuff about 4 months back & saw it happen actually. The fool was showing off, pulled a wheelie at very high speed & lost it (on the brow of a blind hill, having just overtaken several vehicles in a no overtaking stretch & way in excess of the speed limit). Both he & his pillion passenger were wearing full leather race suits & they both wore through. I understand the passenger came off worst & has since had multiple skin grafts. They are both still very lucky though as they missed an oncoming car by a matter of inches & I was fully expecting to have to pick up body parts (the bike bounced off either side of the road multiple times & disappeared from sight as did the occupants). I still don't really know how either of them survived that but survive it they did. I doubt the rider will keep his licence though, he certainly doesn't deserve to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I learned a new word today, "pillion". Thank you for that. Not only does this forum help to reduce the pain from my seemingly never-ending wait for my car, but it also nourishes my mind.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top