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I read in one of the pre-production tests that the body was too flexy... Not that I would be caught dead in a Corvette...

Strange how it works, a Mustang was a childhood dream, it almost feels natural to get one. A Porsche 911 was a lifelong dream. It almost felt natural to test-drive one and choose the 718 instead...:eek: I even had a Camaro for Chrissakes... BUT, I never dreamt of a Corvette, never cared about one, and the new sheetmetal leaves me cold.
 

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I lost the love for Corvettes after 1967, no desire since. I think a good part of that lack of desire was due to cars like the Miura and Dino. Those made the 1968+ Corvettes look like a bloated beached fish! I think the C8 is not bad but still not an object of desire like a Miura.
MOO, as usual.
 

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Strange no ones mentioned build quality here yet.
Have American cars improved drastically lately?
If I was spending serious money on another new car then build quality and finish is one of the most important things.
i think this is an excellent point. IMO GM, Ford, Chrysler all had their quality nadir in the 1970s. They have certainly improved by light years since then but I do not perceive they compete, or will ever compete, with German and Asian manufactures with respect to quality and longevity. My brother-in-law recently purchased two Cadillac Escalades to replace Mercedes SUVs. I would be very hard pressed to explain my perceptions but the Escalades, aside from driving like top heavy swaying 18 wheelers, just do not have the solid quality feel both in handling and materials the Mercedes did. My sister has told me they are going back to foreign manufacturers. The US manufacturers only started to improve their products in the 70s when Japanese cars started to kick their butts. They did not improve because it was the right way to business, only to compete. I perceive this culture still exists, and, as a result, I have not purchased a US manufacturers’ vehicle since I traded a 1971 Buick Turd for an incredibly eye opening 1974 Datsun 260Z.
 

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I brought up build quality on another thread and was assured by a staunch supporter that the quality is there. I would have a hard time believing it unless I experienced it long-term and that’s not happening. The only American-made vehicle I’ve owned since the early 80s was a 91 Chevy pickup. And that was only because at that point the foreign auto makers hadn’t started making full-sized pickups. Actually, I did own a Honda that was made in Marysville, OH. It will definitely be interesting to see how sales go for the C8 compared to their projections (hopes). I still think the 718 cars will continue to draw people to the brand.
 

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I have not purchased a US manufacturers’ vehicle since I traded a 1971 Buick Turd for an incredibly eye opening 1974 Datsun 260Z.
"Buick Turd" :ROFLMAO:

My dad had always wanted a Buick for some reason. I guess back in the day, they were a sign you had arrived. He finally was able to swing moving "up" to one in 1973, and it was a Buick Century. He was so hot on it that he never took it on the highway on the test drive...big mistake. 1973 was the first year of the low-compression "smog engines". To make matters worse, he traded his '69 Chevy Malibu for it.

If you're familiar with the movie A Christmas Story, my dad was The Old Man and his furnace from that movie whenever he drove that pig. Lots of floor-boarding the gas pedal and turning the air blue took place in that car.

He finally surrendered and found a low-miles '70 Chevy Malibu instead. It wasn't quite as good as the '69, but I think it saved his mind.
 
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the new sheetmetal leaves me cold.
As you guys have noticed, I always caveat my remarks on topics like this with how subjective opinions of styling are ....... having done that once again :rolleyes:, I have to say I completely agree with you on the styling. For me, Lamborghini is the only large auto manufacturer that gets the "angular", hard lines thing right. The Corvette C8 looks like it's trying way too hard to win the angular war. But hey, one man's Picasso is another man's velvet Elvis :p

Now McLaren has some great looking curves in it's current lineup, IMHO. Subjective, totally subjective I tell you ;):geek::giggle:
 

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As you guys have noticed, I always caveat my remarks on topics like this with how subjective opinions of styling are ....... having done that once again :rolleyes:, I have to say I completely agree with you on the styling. For me, Lamborghini is the only large auto manufacturer that gets the "angular", hard lines thing right. The Corvette C8 looks like it's trying way too hard to win the angular war. But hey, one man's Picasso is another man's velvet Elvis :p

Now McLaren has some great looking curves in it's current lineup, IMHO. Subjective, totally subjective I tell you ;):geek::giggle:
Being subjective is not exclusive to having a winning point of view...

"Bird never build nest in empty tree."
- James Bond, You Only Live Twice
 
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The new design should have been called something else. It has no relation to what a Corvette was; a sleak, front engine, rear-wheel drive sports car. In all its forms, it was always that. The C8 bears no resemblance to the lineage.

Regarding the OP? Nah. ;)
 

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If Zora had had his way the 'Vette would have gone mid-engine in the '60s.
@GTS18BGTS
Precisely. Some would argue that the C8 is the first 'proper' Corvette -- including, likely, Zora himself.

But even so, I'll repeat what I said in a previous post: The only major difference between C8 and C7 is platform. I, for one, do not subscribe to the belief that the Corvette is defined solely by platform, just as the Porsche 911 is not defined solely by air cooling, rear-engine location, natural aspiration, a whale tail, a Targa option, etc.

In fact, I would argue that a Corvette is defined more reliably by its use of a V8 engine than any one single other factor. That said, I'm convinced that the largest single reason the 'vette went mid-engine is to enable hybridization long-term (as in late C8-C10) -- first in 'mild' form, and later, completely, with an eye on eventually downsizing the ICE engine. The design of the new 911 has aspects of this, as well.
 

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That said, I'm convinced that the largest single reason the 'vette went mid-engine is to enable hybridization long-term (as in late C8-C10) -- first in 'mild' form, and later, completely, with an eye on eventually downsizing the ICE engine.
A 'Vette with an electric motor and V6. The lamenting over Porsche's F4t will be applause by comparison to the caterwauling the 'Vette faithful will do the day that hits the news.
 

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A 'Vette with an electric motor and V6. The lamenting over Porsche's F4t will be applause by comparison to the caterwauling the 'Vette faithful will do the day that hits the news.
Technically the most efficient solution when downsizing an engine is to reduce cylinder count, it makes the engine both cheaper to manufacture and more efficient than a similar displacing engine with more cylinders.
Than being said I have never really understood the choice by manufacturers to use cylinder count reduction rather than cylinder displacement reduction when downsizing the engine of a sportscar or another car where the engine plays a more emotional role.
Not that I am dissatisfied by my F4T in my 718, but i think Porsche could have had stronger sales and better press reviews if they had fitted it with a downsized and turbocharged flat 6.
I have owned an '89 BMW E30 320i, which was equipped with a 2 litre straight six, so why not a modern 2 litre turbo flat six in a Porsche, I don't believe that Porsche could not have figured out how to make a turbo flat six which would fit the 982 chassis, despite the fact existing Porsche flat six would not fit with a turbo.
I know it would have been a more expensive solution, but it would have made better headlines, and the engine could be reused in an entry level 911 or in a hybrid 911.

I recently saw the following video proving that high cylinder count low displacement engine is in fact possible, despite the car in the video is a '65 F1 car :LOL:
 

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I have owned an '89 BMW E30 320i, which was equipped with a 2 litre straight six, so why not a modern 2 litre turbo flat six in a Porsche, I don't believe that Porsche could not have figured out how to make a turbo flat six which would fit the 982 chassis, despite the fact existing Porsche flat six would not fit with a turbo.
A very knowledgeable friend once told me that the I-6 was the best-balancing configuration possible. But it takes up a lot of room, which is why it became less common. I bet the auto world would've had many more amazing powerplants if that weren't the case.

A far as a Teenie Turbo Six, I would bet that the artificial ceiling of performance protecting the 911 has much to do with it. Imagine a 982 with 400+ hp and the torque curve it has now. Crunch go the 911 numbers. The motor could probably be de-rated, but then that defeats the point of building it for a 982.

There also may be issues with component size. Dividing down into six cylinders may raise durability issues. Maybe some of our more knowledgeable members will weigh in on that.
 
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A very knowledgeable friend once told me that the I-6 was the best-balancing configuration possible. But it takes up a lot of room, which is why it became less common. I bet the auto world would've had many more amazing powerplants if that weren't the case.

A far as a Teenie Turbo Six, I would bet that the artificial ceiling of performance protecting the 911 has much to do with it. Imagine a 982 with 400+ hp and the torque curve it has now. Crunch go the 911 numbers. The motor could probably be de-rated, but then that defeats the point of building it for a 982.

There also may be issues with component size. Dividing down into six cylinders may raise durability issues. Maybe some of our more knowledgeable members will weigh in on that.
Your friend is indeed very knowledgeable, a straight six is inherently balanced for both primary and secondary forces due to the arrangement and movement of the pistons, this results in a very smooth engine with no need for balance shafts.
But they are rather long compared to a straight four turbo or a V6, Mercedes has recently introduced a new straight six in place of a V6, so there is still hope for the straight six.

I think that a 1.5 or 2 liter turbo flat six would be a fantastic solution, and with so low a displacement it should not pose a threat to the 911.

I don't think durability is the biggest issue with a miniature flat six, cost is primary, and cost goes up when component count increases.
If comparing two similar engines with identical displacement but different cylinder count, the one with more cylinders will be less efficient, more cylinders = more components = more friction = more loss = less efficiency.
And seeing as efficiency is the name of the game these days, a 2 liter six cylinder engine in a new car is very unlikely.
I have also read of a study which showed that the ideal cylinder size from a efficiency standpoint is around 0.5 liters, it has amongst other things something to do with the ratio of cylinder volume and combustion chamber surface area as far as I understood it.
But I just feel that manufacturers of luxury sportscars should not let the demand for more efficiency rule over emotion... There are of course several examples of Porsche not doing so, but that is primarily in their top end cars like GT3 and GT2.
 

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Back on topic. As for myself, I have decided to keep my 17 CS after reading the reviews of the C8. I was originally going to trade or sell but Im not willing to compromise handling, braking, fit and finish for new C8. As a result I'll be hanging on to my 718 until the C8 short comings are figured out. I bet lots of folks are in the same boat after the reviews came out. Good news is, I get to keep my car and my 5k deposit ?
 
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