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Discussion Starter #1
Do any folks have opinions on what the long term reliability will be of the 718 turbo engines under normal use (i.e. not racing)? Since I have a BS I'm particularly interested in the 2.5l.

I imagine we won't know for sure until it's all said and done. But am thinking people more knowledgable than I in the history of Porsche turbo engines and engines in general might have some thoughts?
 

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I have owned turbo engined cars for the last 20 years (Edit: 25 years!! Started in 96). Mostly Japanese (Subaru) and some German (BMW and now Porsche). My 1992 Subaru Liberty (Legacy) RS turbo was modified for 95% of the time I owned it for about 15 years. It was used for circuit racing probably 15 days. When I sold it, it had just under 400,000kms and had driven around much of Australia. There were some major engine works done in that time (heads replaced due to a lifter issue), but there was nothing turbo related that failed. I would say that standard or mild mods, you are unlikely to see anything failing because it has a turbo before a great deal of kms/miles.
 

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Two turbos owned before and they were not recent. One was an '85 Saab 900T and the other an '89 Toyota Supra. Owned both from new. Sold the Saab with 85k miles on it. It was still running and looking like new. Sold the Supra with 100k miles in the same condition as the Saab. Never had issues with either. Can't speak to the reliability of our dear 718s long term, but they are Porsches ;)
 

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The 4 cylinder engine is a spin off of the 6 cylinder ( i.e minus two cylinders ) and according to Porsche, this allows it to be built on basically the same assembly line.
Apart from the IMS shaft issue, Porsche engines seem to be reliable and well built, and if only used for road use where they don't see a lot of stress, I cannot see why
they would not last for a goodly amount of time, as long as you service it as scheduled, or service it more frequently ( oil and filters are cheap and a bit of time under the car
is not that difficult ). However, there will be random failures, as there are with all things mechanical.
 

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I've had almost exclusively turbo cars since my 1992 Mitsubishi Eclipse. Turbos have been fine, except for my 2001 Audi S4. The K03 turbos tended to have early life failures, and one of mine started to go after 125K miles. This was apparently not uncommon at the time.
 

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Oh that reminds me. My wifes 2013 Audi A4 2.0T required a replacement of the electronic wastegate actuator at about 100,000kms. The turbo itself is still going strong with an APR tune for most of that time. I have had many issues with that car and another Audi I have owned (unrelated to turbo... mostly electronics and crappy coolant lines/header tank) and will never buy another Audi!!
 

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Many years ago I think reliability concerns with turbo engines was warranted. A significant number of failures were related to lubrication problems and some cars required a mandatory turbo cool down routine prior to shut-down. But now manufacturers know a lot more about keeping a turbo alive. For example, my Fiat 500 Abarth has an electric coolant pump which runs for a while after engine shut down to cool the turbo. That is just one way to solve the problem of oil baking to death inside a screaming hot turbo which used to lead to bearing failures inside the turbo. Of course, oil producers have improved their product too to the point that these days turbo reliability is, as others have said, a non issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks folks! I had forgotten that the 4 cylinder is derived from the 6 cylinder and so should be similarly reliable. And it sounds like the fact that it's turbo shouldn't really affect its life... i.e. there's not undue stress on the engine. They really are designed with turbos in mind, not like a bolt on aftermarket to an NA engine.
 

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Forged parts are good for taking more power (tune/more boost, rpm) or stress (track time), but would make little difference to the long term reliability of a typically road driven car. Most turbo cars do not have forged parts, and still last a long time if the parts are not over-stressed.
 
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