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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used these products. They look pretty nice.


 

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My 2 cents:

It seems everyone is getting into the microfiber game -- probably because the profit margin is high and manufacturing and marketing has become semi-ubiquitous: "Oh, it's a microfiber, so it must be good!"

Thing is, like many textile-based products like this, the vast majority of it comes from China and is fraughts with issues: Edge piping that scratches, tags that can't be removed, fiber shedding (Beware of microfibers that say 'Wash before use' because the best practice is to never use a washed microfiber on a painted and waxed surface), etc.

Good microfiber should have four immediate traits:
- A thread count appropriate for the surface (The higher the thread count, the more gentle the towel, with some tradeoffs)
- Acceptable for use right out of the package (no washing needed, and little to no fiber shedding)
- No edge piping or seams whatsoever, except on cloths meant for drying -- and those seams should be silk or another nonabrasive fabric
- Manufacture in South Korea or Japan, both of which have established standards for defining and manufacturing microfiber

I order mine from Amazon from The Rag Company; I gave them a shot after the ones I used from The Chemical Guys went downhill quality-wise because it started using Chinese textile. Nothing but great things to say about TRC's rags, except that on occasion one will fiber-shed. After a wash they're perfectly use-able for around-the-house stuff, as well.
 

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+1 for the Rag Company, great quality especially their edgeless towels. I went a tad overboard with microfiber towels and I don't think I will be able to use all of them in my lifetime.......sad but true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
+1 for the Rag Company, great quality especially their edgeless towels. I went a tad overboard with microfiber towels and I don't think I will be able to use all of them in my lifetime.......sad but true.
Which kind did you buy? I'm guessing you bought as case? :eek:
 

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High quality MF. MF Waffle Weave cloths are great for cleaning and drying glass.
 

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never use a washed microfiber on a painted and waxed surface
Wow, i've never heard that one before. While I understand the logic behind this i'm not sure how practical it is. I wash all my microfibre towels after use (admittely using the extra rinse cycles setting on my washing machine and never using fabric softener). They eventually get past their best and I demote them for use elsewhere but if I had to use a new one every time i'd probably be broke :eek:
 

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......because the best practice is to never use a washed microfiber on a painted and waxed surface), etc......
I was also surprised to read this. I'm not disputing you.....but I am surprised.

In fact I had just bought some new microfiber towels when I bought the Cayman and have washed it a number of times now. Thanks for the tip on better-quality microfiber towels: will check that out.

One site I had looked at actually had different advice about this, but we know we can't believe everything we read on the internet ;)
(link below).

https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/how-to-clean-a-car-with-a-microfiber-cloth
 

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I do wash my microfiber towels using the detergent "All Free and Clear" on fast wash (no fabric softener) then I dry them on delicate setting (want to avoid high heat) will damage the towel fibers by causing the polyester fibers to melt.
I also wash towels separately based upon their use......waxing, window, general cleaning towels, wheel towels etc.......want to avoid transfer of chemical to each towel. Don't want wax on your glass cleaning towels. I also designate different colors based upon purpose........windows, paint general cleaning, waxing, interior, wheel, etc.....
 

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My detailer, who also does window tint and Opti-Coat uses Optimum towels and washes them after every use. He has a washing machine in his shop.

A new cloth every use would add substantially to the costs and make for huge pollution issues. Microfibres are not good for the environment at all.
 

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My detailer, who also does window tint and Opti-Coat uses Optimum towels and washes them after every use. He has a washing machine in his shop.

A new cloth every use would add substantially to the costs and make for huge pollution issues. Microfibres are not good for the environment at all.

@Chris NZ @aeronca65tl
Not washing microfiber sounds extreme, I'll admit -- it's advice I was given by a couple of detailers, as well as a suggestion by Optimum back when microfiber was just becoming an option over other textiles such as cheesecloth and chamois.

The key is the phrase 'painted and waxed surface'. Any sort of solid molecule has the potential to scratch and abrade, and washing -- particularly machine washing -- can potentially embed those into the cloth. If you do wash them and reuse them on a waxed surface, best practice is to wash them with as pure a detergent as possible, only with other microfiber, on a gentle cycle with minimal spin and agitation, and line dry.

Food for thought: Occasionally I'll drop a microfiber on the ground (A tip: NEVER let a microfiber touch the ground. Treat it like the American flag in that regard). It happens, LOL ... I'll shake that microfiber vigorously, pick out any big bits I see, and either 'retire' the microfiber of use it elsewhere on the car. At least half the time after I wash that microfiber, I find things -- tiny pebbles, near-microscopic wood chips, bits of leaf, what have you -- still embedded in the cloth. Microfiber, particularly in 'plush' weaves, does not shed solid contaminants easily.

Unless you've sullied them hard-to-remove chemicals or other substances (adhesive, tar, thicker oils, etc.), you can wash them and reuse them for a myriad of other uses both on the car (wheels, plastic, interior) and at home, as I allude to in my post. So you're not throwing them away immediately after use; you're just downgrading their use.
 
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