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Well, I checked it at 5000 +/- and it said full (first time i tried the e-dipstick I think). then at 7000 (or so) it was a quart low. My main takeaway is I miss a real dipstick.... FWIW, no smoke, no leaks. I don't know (says cousin Eddie in christmas vacation)

and at 7800k, it is still full
 

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Well, I checked it at 5000 +/- and it said full (first time i tried the e-dipstick I think). then at 7000 (or so) it was a quart low. My main takeaway is I miss a real dipstick.... FWIW, no smoke, no leaks. I don't know (says cousin Eddie in christmas vacation)

and at 7800k, it is still full
There have been numerous comments over the years lamenting (often condemning) the lack of an analogue dipstick. Won't speak for the world, but we're effectively 99% in disagreement with Porsche on this one. Porsche's engineers have never sold us out, so we'll have to trust them on this one. Regardless, that won't prevent me from dreaming of a real metal dipstick.
 
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2018 BOXSTER BASE PDK. 2018 MACAN S
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Don't this is normal, but I received that message at 4,800 miles after adding a quart at about 2,200 miles and she will soon need at quart again as the level has dropped about half way down on the display. Current mileage is 6,850.

She is a 21 CGTS delivered in August.
Both my Boxster and MACAN,the digital oil gauge fluctuates and usually not all the way to the top
I have had. Couple SA’s tell me it’s normal and don’t add oil unless it says add oil
 

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2021 Boxster GTS 4.0
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Yes, I have added over a liter of oil in the first 10K miles to keep it full. The harder you run it, the more it will likely consume. You should get in the habit of checking the oil level after each fuel fillup.
 

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I learned from an Amsoil engineer many years ago that if you break in an engine too delicately you will never achieve optimal piston ring seating and shaping because there isn't enough pressure on the rings as they scrub against the new cylinder wall to achieve this. The issue with break in is not pressure, torque, power, or even RPM - it is HEAT. There was a video last year of a Porsche engineer testing a brand new engine on the test bed, taking it under heavy load to maximum RPM. That engine was then put in a car and shipped to the customer. When asked about it he said the same thing: the issue is HEAT in a new engine's break-in, not all of that other stuff you always heard about. You can hit it hard, all the way to redline, provided you come off of it immediately and cool things back down. It happens quickly. Of course, they can't tell you to go out and drive it hard like that (too much liability), so they instead tell you to vary your speed, cycle through the gears, and limit the RPM. They tell you to limit the RPM because you must limit heat early on. It is critical.

If you think this is balderdash, one of the guys at the Porsche experience center in Atlanta told me they take a new car, cycle it like crazy for 100 miles, and then it's off to the track. That's it. Their cars do very well.

The way to break in an engine is to cycle it. When you are on the gas, the piston rings are under more pressure and scrub against the honing in the cylinder walls, matching their shape perfectly. This produces very small bits of metal. When you are off the gas and the engine goes into overrun, the pressure on the rings drops and the cylinder walls flush with oil, taking the little metal filing bits away to be collected by the filter.

If you break in an engine too delicately, you aren't helping it; you are hurting it. The rings may never fully match the cylinder walls, and the result can be oil blowing past the rings. How do you know this is a problem? Your engine may burn some oil right off the bat for other reasons, but it will also do it for this reason, resulting in a need to add oil to an engine very early in its life. The problem will not go away, but take heart, it doesn't tend to get any worse either with high quality oil in the engine.

I currently have a Ducati Multistrada that I bought with less than 3000 miles on it. It went through its break in period with a female rider that was new to motorcycling, and she never got on the throttle - ever. It's still a good bike, but it is the only modern Ducati I've ever seen that uses oil. Reason? Its break-in was just too delicate and the rings allow a little oil to blow past them. It goes through about 1/4 liter of oil every 1500 miles or so, depending on how hard I am riding it (the harder I ride it, the sooner it will need a little oil).

I broke in my 718 by varying the throttle for about an hour on back roads, then cycled it hard through the first tank of gas. Break in complete. It starts and runs like the beast it was meant to be and I love it. 11,000 miles and it doesn't use a single drop, and it makes scorching power (I believe it to be significantly more output than the 350 advertised based on acceleration times).

I realize this is hard to accept, but remember the experts say now that there is no reason for high quality (expensive) oil to be changed every 3000 miles, but most of you do it anyway. Sent a batch to Amsoil for testing after 7,500 miles of hot summer driving, and their test showed that it was still nearly perfect. It's very hard to ditch conventional wisdom, even if it is the best advice you ever had.

One thing you might try...
if your car has never been driven hard and never seen redline, get out there and do it. Cycle the turbo to maximum pressure and the engine up to redline, then let all the way off the gas to under 2000 RPM. Repeat. Depending on what's going on in there, it might help, and it certainly won't hurt.

Cheers. You can flog me if you will, but I have seen all of this to be true as a result of servicing the motorcycles that come through my little shop.
 

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Cheers. You can flog me if you will, but I have seen all of this to be true as a result of servicing the motorcycles that come through my little shop.
I’m not an automotive engineer, but every engineering and scientific instinct I have says you are right about this. It makes perfect sense. Also I’ve heard the same from race engineers and from an instructor at PSDS and a friend who is an automotive engineer at VW.

Makes sense. Thanks for sharing that perspective. I think people underestimate the risk of not pushing the motors enough.
 

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T Mitchell... thanks for the insight. I may not (nor have) meet redline staying under the 4k RPMs for the first 2k miles, but I do my best to hard rev the engine up/down and as high as 4k and then back down, rinse, repeat. I look like a weirdo I'm sure anywhere I go, but I'm trying to give the thing a workout.

Love reading posts like yours, thanks!
 

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… if you break in an engine too delicately you will never achieve optimal piston ring seating …
I completely agree.

It‘s been conclusively demonstrated that the ‘keep under 4k’ “rules” are for the U.S. whereas in most other countries the directive is to ensure that oil and water are at operating temperature (> 185°F) before high-load or high-RPM operation.

The latter is of course what should be done 100% of the time for the life of the car.

I broke my 991 TT in on the autobahn. Once it was warm I didn’t baby it a bit. But, I didn’t do sustained high-load or high-rpm operation - just bursts (which is all you really get anyway these days.)

In 20k-miles I have detected no oil usage.

And on the subject of oil…

that there is no reason for high quality (expensive) oil to be changed every 3000 miles,
… I agree also.

The main reason to change the oil every year is to get under/over/around the car to look for other issues or signs of issues to come.

The insanity is that folks will change their oil every year regardless of mileage but will never change their brake fluid…
 

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I completely agree.

It‘s been conclusively demonstrated that the ‘keep under 4k’ “rules” are for the U.S. whereas in most other countries the directive is to ensure that oil and water are at operating temperature (> 185°F) before high-load or high-RPM operation.

The latter is of course what should be done 100% of the time for the life of the car.

I broke my 991 TT in on the autobahn. Once it was warm I didn’t baby it a bit. But, I didn’t do sustained high-load or high-rpm operation - just bursts (which is all you really get anyway these days.)

In 20k-miles I have detected no oil usage.

And on the subject of oil…



… I agree also.

The main reason to change the oil every year is to get under/over/around the car to look for other issues or signs of issues to come.

The insanity is that folks will change their oil every year regardless of mileage but will never change their brake fluid…
Given the volume of tracking planned, my brake fluid will be changed at every oil change. This includes the first change after break-in at 2,000 miles, because I intend to replace with Modul RBF-600 before the first track day.
 

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Given the volume of tracking planned, my brake fluid will be changed at every oil change. This includes the first change after break-in at 2,000 miles, because I intend to replace with Modul RBF-600 before the first track day.
FYI, some folks have reported squeaky brake and/or clutch master cylinders after using non-LV (Low Viscosity) brake fluid. Squeaks disappeared after return to LV fluid. If Motul has a LV high-temp fluid I’d want to use that preferentially over a non-LV fluid. If not and you experience squeaking hydraulics then you know why.

This for “modern” Porsche’s (e.g. 991,981, or newer.)
 

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FYI, some folks have reported squeaky brake and/or clutch master cylinders after using non-LV (Low Viscosity) brake fluid. Squeaks disappeared after return to LV fluid. If Motul has a LV high-temp fluid I’d want to use that preferentially over a non-LV fluid. If not and you experience squeaking hydraulics then you know why.

This for “modern” Porsche’s (e.g. 991,981, or newer.)
Thanks for the heads up. Knowing COTA was on the menu for our BS, I decided it was important to use a fluid with a higher boiling point. Motul RBF-600 came highly recommended by some of our PCA members, some on this and another forum, and my Inde. It gave me better peace of mind while tracking our PDK BS and performed flawlessly with no squeaks. Hopefully, it will perform the same in our new GTS when it arrives.
 
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