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Evening gents,

Just wondering which folks plan on selling before the warranty period is up, or holding onto your 718. Obviously Porsche's can be expensive to maintain and service but I wonder if perhaps folks plan on long term ownership or not. I "was" on the fence about switching to the C8 Vette but after the reviews and really the thought of partying with my CS, I'm beginning to appreciate it more and more. I am however looking for a " long term" toy so I'm wondering what others plans were insofar as their 718 ownership?
 

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My plan is to keep it long-term. I say that, but do not have a stellar track record. I bought I custom Big Dog motorcycle that was to die for and thought I'd keep that long-term. Not so much - sold it 2 years after purchase. Wife is convinced the 718 will suffer the same fate - she has good intuition and knows me too well. If I do keep it, I won't be doing the scheduled maintenance at the intervals recommended past the warrenty period since depreciation will have taken most of the value out of it by then anyway. And, since I'm not tracking or abusing it otherwise, less frequent-than-recommended maintenance shouldn't be a problem IMHO.
 

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Kept my last convertible 20 years. 15 years and post retirement later, we put a sapphire blue metallic BS in the garage...until death do us part.

That was the plan. Except now I find myself glued to the 458 Italia Spider classifieds. This can’t be good ?
 

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Warranty expiration means nothing to me. I’m driving this one until I find a better Cayman. Next year, ten years, whatever.
 

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Not sure honestly. That being said I’ve been obsessed with the GT3 after my PEC visit.

Funny side note. After PEC I figured I’d start prepping the wife with ideas of another Porsche. She looks at me and kinda snapped. “You just bought that one and you already want another one?” She said. I said no, I wasn’t really thinking of getting two just now. But another one in the future. ? The positioning has to start early. Lol
 

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Not having any automotive abilities and given the high costs of repair I am thinking that at 4 years I will likely swap into a two year CPO car that essentially has another 4 years of warranty ahead of it. By going for the two year old I will be avoiding the biggest depreciation bite although I fully understand that the next 4 years still have a fair amount of depreciation and it truly levels out at around 6 years.

That is my plan for now but it will depend on how the reliability of the 718 plays out over the next 4 years, what issues I have with my personal car and what options there are to move up to in 4 years time.
 

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Not sure honestly. That being said I’ve been obsessed with the GT3 after my PEC visit.

Funny side note. After PEC I figured I’d start prepping the wife with ideas of another Porsche. She looks at me and kinda snapped. “You just bought that one and you already want another one?” She said. I said no, I wasn’t really thinking of getting two just now. But another one in the future. ? The positioning has to start early. Lol
Good move. She might spank you for going for two Porsches, or she might say yes. That's what I call a win-win! ;)
 

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I'm keeping mine way past the warranty. In my experience with previous cayman/boxsters they don't have any major issues until around 8 years old. At that time you may have to start replacing things like water pumps, etc. So 8 years is my current target. Of course this also assumes there is a better more fun car out there to replace it with. If there isn't then I'll just keep fixing it. :)
 

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I have a terrible track record for swapping cars out way too fast but somehow this car feels different. I think this will be the first car I have owned (and I have owned over 20) that if I sell, I will regret it immediately. Pretty much every other car I sell I have very little attachment to...so long way of saying I am hoping I keep this car past the warranty period, which is 4 years from now as I bought the car brand new a month ago.
 

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I'm pretty much with @DriveInHouston as about which will expire first (the car or me). I ordered and had this built exactly to my liking and for my purposes (for fun only) and it is essentially all that I want from a little sports car. However, I may make a mod or two. Thinking about trying a short shifter and maybe a TWL ducktail. If I get wild and crazy(er), I might spring for a front lip and rear diffuser someday. But the car, in reality, is everything I desire.
 
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My plan is to keep it long-term. I say that, but do not have a stellar track record. I bought I custom Big Dog motorcycle that was to die for and thought I'd keep that long-term. Not so much - sold it 2 years after purchase. Wife is convinced the 718 will suffer the same fate - she has good intuition and knows me too well. If I do keep it, I won't be doing the scheduled maintenance at the intervals recommended past the warrenty period since depreciation will have taken most of the value out of it by then anyway. And, since I'm not tracking or abusing it otherwise, less frequent-than-recommended maintenance shouldn't be a problem IMHO.
I would suggest a re-thinking of this philosophy, there are many things about scheduled maintenance that prevents other things from happening, especially usage at a frequency or level that leads one to conclude that pre-emptive service is not required... For example, brake fluid is designed to absorb moisture, fail to flush the system in a timely manor and water collects, rust forms and sealing surfaces pit and fail, or failure to replace spark plugs in those very expensive aluminum heads on schedule, when you decide it's time the threads are seized and damage to the heads is unavoidable...

Those with car collections, even modest ones will tell you that certain services and maintenance are required to prevent damage and provide at least some expectation of a reliable driving experience, those that don't follow this will be disappointed. Besides being of modest means this is why I don't not have more than a daily driver and one fun car, I won't risk reliability or reduce my expectations of the car to save a few dollars, if I can't or won't keep the vehicle properly maintained I will sell it.


My 2 cents.
 

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I would suggest a re-thinking of this philosophy, there are many things about scheduled maintenance that prevents other things from happening, especially usage at a frequency or level that leads one to conclude that pre-emptive service is not required... For example, brake fluid is designed to absorb moisture, fail to flush the system in a timely manor and water collects, rust forms and sealing surfaces pit and fail, or failure to replace spark plugs in those very expensive aluminum heads on schedule, when you decide it's time the threads are seized and damage to the heads is unavoidable...

Those with car collections, even modest ones will tell you that certain services and maintenance are required to prevent damage and provide at least some expectation of a reliable driving experience, those that don't follow this will be disappointed. Besides being of modest means this is why I don't not have more than a daily driver and one fun car, I won't risk reliability or reduce my expectations of the car to save a few dollars, if I can't or won't keep the vehicle properly maintained I will sell it.


My 2 cents.
You may be right in the case of Porsche. I neglected to take into account the relatively tight tolerances of this car compared to my other previous work horses (Honda/Toyota). Those vehicles haven't/didn't see a radiator flush/new plugs/brake fluid change, etc in 100K plus miles and never had a failure? You are likely correct and good advice.
 

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You may be right in the case of Porsche. I neglected to take into account the relatively tight tolerances of this car compared to my other previous work horses (Honda/Toyota). Those vehicles haven't/didn't see a radiator flush/new plugs/brake fluid change, etc in 100K plus miles and never had a failure? You are likely correct and good advice.
Yep, I think we are talking a different animal here. These are racing-derived vehicles designed for near-to-limits driving and folks who race are always changing their fluids, particularly oil and brake. Those, like me, who drive in a spirited (but usually legal) way and also do a little tracking can likely stick to recommended schedule. One day, I may get to the point of having to replace my brake fluid more frequently, but that ain't happening soon.
 
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I keep cars a while. For the CS, I traded in my '99 BMW M3 which I liked a lot, had it for 18 years. In recent years my wife developed trouble with her knees and left foot, making the M3 manual shifting uncomfortable, and for road trips I thought it best to have her able to drive "my" car willingly. The CS has the PDK, solving that issue. As a result I'm putting on mileage faster with the CS than I did on the M3.

As to future cars, I wouldn't mind a hybrid, as driving range is critical, but I'm looking for battery technology beyond Lithium-ion. Down the road, the cost of replacement batteries is a serious drawback. I could possibly still have the CS in 18 years!
 
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