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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, nice to meet you all :laugh: I'm planning on ordering a Cayman in 2018 (might be the 2019 models by then).

I was originally planning to get PASM, but the clearance of the Cayman really worries me. Assuming I get a completely stock Cayman will I be able to comfortably drive in NYC and not worry about regular potholes or the occasional speed bump?

Here's what my garage looks like (attached). Will I be fine getting out without scraping?

Thanks!
Sem
 

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You might be okay at the incline changes by moving diagonally.

Can you use a digital angle gauge (from any hardware store) to measure the two angles involved, and ask a dealer? They should have manufacturer specifications for these things, if you can't find them on Planet-9 or Rennslist.

How far away is your nearest dealer? If it's close enough you could do a test drive to your garage, put down some cardboard and see if you scrape it.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You might be okay at the incline changes by moving diagonally.

Can you use a digital angle gauge (from any hardware store) to measure the two angles involved, and ask a dealer? They should have manufacturer specifications for these things, if you can't find them on Planet-9 or Rennslist.

How far away is your nearest dealer? If it's close enough you could do a test drive to your garage, put down some cardboard and see if you scrape it.

Good luck!
Thanks for the suggestions. I will take a measurement.

The dealership isn't very far, but I live in Manhattan and doubt they would let me drive it all the way to my place. It's at least 30 minutes each way with no traffic even though we're only talking 4-5 miles here.
 

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Pro-tip: the best time to get things done, including shopping, museum visits, and especially test drives, is before or during the SuperBowl, assuming the weather is okay.

A 60+ minute test drive should be no problem for a dealer if you're genuinely interested, especially for a sports car in the winter. I tested a 718 Boxster a few months ago in the Bay Area and the dealer gave me the keys and said "go have fun!", and there were no time or distance limits.

Also, this thread may be helpful:

http://www.718forum.com/forum/2017-...forum/7361-base-718-clearance-dimensions.html
 

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Thanks for the suggestions. I will take a measurement.

The dealership isn't very far, but I live in Manhattan and doubt they would let me drive it all the way to my place. It's at least 30 minutes each way with no traffic even though we're only talking 4-5 miles here.
The risk of grounding on change of incline with the 981 & 982 series vehicles is considerably reduced by comparison to the previous 987 series due to reduced overhangs. It is still a possibility however & as Ironman said you could really do with getting a Cayman to your garage to check. Rope in a friend to observe the clearance as you carefully & very slowly attempt to drive in with something protective laid down for good measure. With regards to speed bumps you just need to take your time, there are a couple of strips/protrusions underneath the car at the front which you will hear start to scrape before you will cause any damage to the actual vehicle (they won't catch first on a sharp change of incline though so don't rely on them for that). There is only one speed bump local to me where the strips/protrusions can catch & that's because the bump has been particularly badly designed. It's actually the only one I've encountered anywhere that can be problematic & I've heard other cars of various descriptions scrape there as well (particularly fairly compact ones such as Mini's). So long as I'm very careful & crawl over it then there is sufficient clearance in my Boxster S with PASM to clear without any contact even on the warning strips, so they really aren't that bad in terms of clearance. As for potholes, well it depends on the size, but it would have to be a really enormous example for the actual car to catch & if it were that large then you'd have to also be concerned about serious wheel & suspension damage. But that's hardly unique to these vehicles & would be the same in the vast majority of other cars as well. I live in the U.K & due to austerity measures on some of our roads you play dodge the pothole, but these cars with some minor limitations are extremely practical & you're probably worrying a little excessively. The only thing you really need to concern yourself with is that garage access, with everything else just exercise a little bit of extra caution & you'll be fine.
 

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I would also make sure you get the smallest diameter wheels you can. I think that is 18" on the base Cayman. Anything bigger and you increase the risk of damaging the wheel on pot holes.
 

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I would also make sure you get the smallest diameter wheels you can. I think that is 18" on the base Cayman. Anything bigger and you increase the risk of damaging the wheel on pot holes.
True there is obviously less risk with the smaller wheels but to my eyes they just don't look very nice on a 718 & look rather lost. Despite the fact we have many potholes I've been lucky enough not to experience any damage with the 20 inch & I also had them on my previous car & 19 inch on the car before that.
 

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True there is obviously less risk with the smaller wheels but to my eyes they just don't look very nice on a 718 & look rather lost. Despite the fact we have many potholes I've been lucky enough not to experience any damage with the 20 inch & I also had them on my previous car & 19 inch on the car before that.
Yes, but the OP lives in Manhattan. The only way to begin to comprehend how difficult it is to own a car in Manhattan, much less drive one on a day-to-day basis, is to see it in action in person. It makes London look like a series of freshly paved parking lots ... and actually, most Northeast cities are like this, particularly Philly and Boston. Low-profile wheels/tires are just a bad idea. I know folks in all three cities who have purposefully minused their performance-car setups because of it.

OP: I've got to think Manhattan Motorcars encounters your quandary regularly. I would call up a salesman there and ask about it directly -- and, as backup, try Town Porsche in Englewood or Porsche of Larchmont. One of those three dealers will give you the info you need, if not allow you to test drive a 718 to your door and back.
 

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Yes, but the OP lives in Manhattan. The only way to begin to comprehend how difficult it is to own a car in Manhattan, much less drive one on a day-to-day basis, is to see it in action in person. It makes London look like a series of freshly paved parking lots .
Any particular reason you made a comparison to London & quoted my previous comment? Because where I live the roads aren't anything like the roads in London either & are absolutely full of potholes. The only way to begin to comprehend just how poor the state of the roads here are is if you owned a car here, or had to drive one on a day to day basis, which you do not. So we both only have the one point of reference don't we? But a pothole is a pothole is a pothole & that with their potential to cause damage particularly with larger rims is the same wherever they reside & that was all that I referred to in my comment. Like I already said, despite having 20 inch rims I've been lucky enough not to ever sustain any damage & that's just a fact. Even if I were forced to have smaller rims because of continual damage it still wouldn't alter that I'd dislike the look of them (19's are not too bad, but 18's which don't fit my car in any case I personally dislike). However as long as I can continue to get away with 20 inch then that will be my choice every time.
 

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Any particular reason you made a comparison to London & quoted my previous comment? Because where I live the roads aren't anything like the roads in London either & are absolutely full of potholes. The only way to begin to comprehend just how poor the state of the roads here are is if you owned a car here, or had to drive one on a day to day basis, which you do not. So we both only have the one point of reference don't we? But a pothole is a pothole is a pothole & that with their potential to cause damage particularly with larger rims is the same wherever they reside & that was all that I referred to in my comment. Like I already said, despite having 20 inch rims I've been lucky enough not to ever sustain any damage & that's just a fact. Even if I were forced to have smaller rims because of continual damage it still wouldn't alter that I'd dislike the look of them (19's are not too bad, but 18's which don't fit my car in any case I personally dislike). However as long as I can continue to get away with 20 inch then that will be my choice every time.
I used London because it's the UK's largest city, whereas NYC is the U.S.'s largest. Both are in cold, relatively damp climates near the sea ... And I've been to, and driven in, both. But I digress. Sure: potholes are potholes. And low-profile tires are as big a risk in Timbuktu as they are in Tribeca, Camden Town, or wherever else. Congrats on your luck. I know many other urban drivers who have not been so lucky, to the point where I'd personally opt for 18s unless I was running on forged wheels.
 

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I used London because it's the UK's largest city, whereas NYC is the U.S.'s largest. Both are in cold, relatively damp climates near the sea ... And I've been to, and driven in, both. But I digress. Sure: potholes are potholes. And low-profile tires are as big a risk in Timbuktu as they are in Tribeca, Camden Town, or wherever else. Congrats on your luck. I know many other urban drivers who have not been so lucky, to the point where I'd personally opt for 18s unless I was running on forged wheels.
If only the rest of the country did have a fair share of the money spent on roads & general infrastructure as London. As I leave my house there is a six mile stretch of road that they've temporarily reduced the speed from 60 mph down to 40 mph (that's a bit of a laugh in itself because it's been 4 months now). The reason is purely because it so badly needs re-surfacing that higher speeds are now considered dangerous. However goodness knows how long it will be before they finally get around to repairing it. Bear in mind this is a main road & therefore classified as an A class road not a minor or B classification road (It's actually the main road that runs to the ferry port to Ireland). An example of how long repair can take is Treffgarne bends which is actually on the same road but a few miles further on. This was actually worse some time back, in fact a great deal worse & again was subject to the same supposedly "temporary" speed restrictions. However despite the fact the actual bends were reduced to crawling speed the temporary signs celebrated both a birthday & a further six months before those repairs were actually properly carried out. I know it's a little off topic but it may provide a little more enlightenment. But yes I do regard myself as lucky with my wheels, but with tyre's/tires perhaps not so much. I had a new one only a week last Saturday (nail) due to a very slow puncture & I've already got a puncture in the same tyre/tire or on the same corner anyway (screw). The thing is Porsche U.K doesn't recommend tyre/tire repair & only replace. Therefore the first one did a little over 3200 miles or so & the second a mere 130 miles (basically I drove the car home from getting a new tyre/tire & now already need another & a covered transporter back to the OPC). Thank goodness for Porsche assistance, but it's still £289 Sterling each time & a massive £578 for only 3330 miles on the rears. The other back tyre is already half worn as well. :(
 

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The dealership isn't very far, but I live in Manhattan and doubt they would let me drive it all the way to my place. It's at least 30 minutes each way with no traffic even though we're only talking 4-5 miles here.
I would ask if they have a 718 loaner they could give you for some time. My dealer let me test a 718 loaner for a day to make up my mind about the model no problem. My driveway is pretty steep also so I was looking for that peace of mind as well before placing my order.
 
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