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There are a number of threads about this. Search for the term "Sound Aktor".
 

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And in those searches you’ll see my posts about doing it with pictures. I’m asking about removing the physical resonator...
Probably I'm not understanding correctly but why would you want to remove the resonator? If you unplugged the sound actuator (aka amp) the resonator (aka speaker) doesn't do nothing anymore. Or am I wrong?
 

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Yeah, I, too, am confused.
 

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Maybe exhaust system resonator rather than soundaktor?

I suspect engine lights would come on. Who knows what it would do for performance. Maybe a Porsche exhaust specialist would know.
 

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Guys, the OP is talking about an exhaust part that typically lies between the catalytic converter and the end of the midpipe.

On our cars, a Helmholz resonator exists on one side of the OEM exhaust just before the passenger-side muffler. It's the part that creates the major 'burble' sound when we change our cars to "Sport" mode -- though it still partially functions even when off. From Porsche:

The 718’s exhaust system refines the sound further. After passing through the catalytic converter, the exhaust mass flow is split between two pipes of unequal length. The shorter one ends in a classic muffler, which primarily lowers the overall volume. The longer one leads first to a Helmholtz resonator, named after Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, who lived and worked in Berlin in the nineteenth century. Like many of his contemporaries, he was a polymath. His particular interests included nerve cells, the conservation of energy, and magnetic fields. One of his most important discoveries was the resonator that bears his name. This air-filled container has a single opening. When airwaves—or sound—flow past the opening, the air inside the container starts to vibrate and generates a tone.

Most aftermarket exhausts for our cars eliminate this part to enhance flow -- and on some cars it's an easy way to change tone and create slightly better flow. However, OP, because the 718's exhaust is a fairly drastic unequal-length design, I would think twice about simply removing the resonator -- and frankly, I doubt it's removable on its own without replacing a major length of the piping. You may as well slap on a full aftermarket unit at that stage.
 

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Guys, the OP is talking about an exhaust part that typically lies between the catalytic converter and the end of the midpipe.

On our cars, a Helmholz resonator exists on one side of the OEM exhaust just before the passenger-side muffler. It's the part that creates the major 'burble' sound when we change our cars to "Sport" mode -- though it still partially functions even when off. From Porsche:

The 718’s exhaust system refines the sound further. After passing through the catalytic converter, the exhaust mass flow is split between two pipes of unequal length. The shorter one ends in a classic muffler, which primarily lowers the overall volume. The longer one leads first to a Helmholtz resonator, named after Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, who lived and worked in Berlin in the nineteenth century. Like many of his contemporaries, he was a polymath. His particular interests included nerve cells, the conservation of energy, and magnetic fields. One of his most important discoveries was the resonator that bears his name. This air-filled container has a single opening. When airwaves—or sound—flow past the opening, the air inside the container starts to vibrate and generates a tone.

Most aftermarket exhausts for our cars eliminate this part to enhance flow -- and on some cars it's an easy way to change tone and create slightly better flow. However, OP, because the 718's exhaust is a fairly drastic unequal-length design, I would think twice about simply removing the resonator -- and frankly, I doubt it's removable on its own without replacing a major length of the piping. You may as well slap on a full aftermarket unit at that stage.

Ae you sure about the blurbing in "sport mode"?
Then there would be a valve of some sort?
Someone here mentioned that its a richer fuel mix that creates the tone in Sport.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys, the OP is talking about an exhaust part that typically lies between the catalytic converter and the end of the midpipe.
Thanks for helping with that! There are always so many options, resonator or muffler or full system, manifolds ETC and I was hoping someone did one of the small items before splurging on a new system. Hopefully the attached picture helps with the conversation.

Mufflers:
Lowers sound level
Does not eliminate certain frequencies of sound (droning)
Increases engine back pressure.

Resonators:
Cancels certain frequencies
Decreases engine back pressure, increasing performance

I'm not unhappy with the base sound, it's nice, but it can always be louder and deeper in sound IMO.
 

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Ae you sure about the blurbing in "sport mode"?
Then there would be a valve of some sort?
Someone here mentioned that its a richer fuel mix that creates the tone in Sport.
The 'burbling' in Sport is the resonator. It is always present, even at idle.

The 'pops' and 'bangs' in Sport is the richer mixture. It is only present under certain operating conditions. A rich mix doesn't cause an exhaust to change tone at a specific moment. It may after thousands of miles as fuel deposits gunk the exhaust up some, but not immediately, on demand.
 

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The 'burbling' in Sport is the resonator. It is always present, even at idle.

The 'pops' and 'bangs' in Sport is the richer mixture. It is only present under certain operating conditions. A rich mix doesn't cause an exhaust to change tone at a specific moment. It may after thousands of miles as fuel deposits gunk the exhaust up some, but not immediately, on demand.

If we stay att the blurbing, where the h-ll is the valve :D
There has to be something cause there is a difference in tone just going from normal to sport.
I have been looking for it but havent found it, thats why the thing with richer sounded logical.
 

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Guys, the OP is talking about an exhaust part that typically lies between the catalytic converter and the end of the midpipe.

On our cars, a Helmholz resonator exists on one side of the OEM exhaust just before the passenger-side muffler. It's the part that creates the major 'burble' sound when we change our cars to "Sport" mode -- though it still partially functions even when off. From Porsche:

The 718’s exhaust system refines the sound further. After passing through the catalytic converter, the exhaust mass flow is split between two pipes of unequal length. The shorter one ends in a classic muffler, which primarily lowers the overall volume. The longer one leads first to a Helmholtz resonator, named after Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, who lived and worked in Berlin in the nineteenth century. Like many of his contemporaries, he was a polymath. His particular interests included nerve cells, the conservation of energy, and magnetic fields. One of his most important discoveries was the resonator that bears his name. This air-filled container has a single opening. When airwaves—or sound—flow past the opening, the air inside the container starts to vibrate and generates a tone.

Most aftermarket exhausts for our cars eliminate this part to enhance flow -- and on some cars it's an easy way to change tone and create slightly better flow. However, OP, because the 718's exhaust is a fairly drastic unequal-length design, I would think twice about simply removing the resonator -- and frankly, I doubt it's removable on its own without replacing a major length of the piping. You may as well slap on a full aftermarket unit at that stage.
I nominate this for the 2018 718Forum Awards as Best Technical Explanation In A Response To OP Question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The 'burbling' in Sport is the resonator. It is always present, even at idle.

The 'pops' and 'bangs' in Sport is the richer mixture. It is only present under certain operating conditions. A rich mix doesn't cause an exhaust to change tone at a specific moment. It may after thousands of miles as fuel deposits gunk the exhaust up some, but not immediately, on demand.

If we stay att the blurbing, where the h-ll is the valve /forum/images/718forum/smilies/tango_face_grin.png
There has to be something cause there is a difference in tone just going from normal to sport.
I have been looking for it but havent found it, thats why the thing with richer sounded logical.
It is just opening up the channel more. Most cars to some degree have something to open and close parts of the exhaust to lower sound. Sport most likely opens it up. It’s like the Aston Martin V8 Vantage where you could remove the fuse leaving it open all the time. If someone if brave and wants to try I’m sure a lot of us will appreciate it.
 

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It is just opening up the channel more. Most cars to some degree have something to open and close parts of the exhaust to lower sound. Sport most likely opens it up. It’s like the Aston Martin V8 Vantage where you could remove the fuse leaving it open all the time. If someone if brave and wants to try I’m sure a lot of us will appreciate it.

Well i am still not convinced :)
 

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I couldn't find any reference to a valve in the standard exhaust. Has anyone found one, or another way of directing the exhaust gasses to the resonator?

While the stoichiometric air-fuel mixture is best for economy, richer mixtures are likely to change the sound as well as generate more power and burn cooler. The sport mode on my non-S costs very little fuel at steady speeds (no farting), but it does cost some.

The pops and bangs are indeed extra fuel but AFAIK this extra is injected during the exhaust cycle, not the charge cycle.

It sounds like someone needs to get a hold of a Porsche engineer (if they'll actually tell us).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is just opening up the channel more. Most cars to some degree have something to open and close parts of the exhaust to lower sound. Sport most likely opens it up. It’s like the Aston Martin V8 Vantage where you could remove the fuse leaving it open all the time. If someone if brave and wants to try I’m sure a lot of us will appreciate it.

Well i am still not convinced /forum/images/718forum/smilies/tango_face_smile.png
not sure I understand your response. The two different exhausts are not referring to the possible valve that I’m speculating.
 

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not sure I understand your response. The two different exhausts are not referring to the possible valve that I’m speculating.

Sorry!
Dont mind the Fabspeed, that was the only good pic of the Oem that i could find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
not sure I understand your response. The two different exhausts are not referring to the possible valve that I’m speculating.

Sorry!
Dont mind the Fabspeed, that was the only good pic of the Oem that i could find.
no worries! I’m sure there’s some trickery we can’t easily find, but I honestly think something opens up or is less restricted when SPORT is engaged.
 
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