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Asking your opinion about Steel vs Titanium wheel stud and lug nuts.

I have 718 Boxster S and have bought 18" APEX EC-7R forged wheels as dedicated track days wheels and also have stock 19" and 20" wheels. I'm changing the wheels quite often, especially during track weekends. My question is - are Titanium wheels studs and nuts will fit motorsport application? I heard from some forums that the Titanium is not good for track use and never used in professional motorsport due to Titanium is very prone to cracking. Other vendors, like Titan-7 advertise their lug nuts made from forged Titanium and add Race Lug Nuts. APEX highly recommend using MSI stud conversion kit, which made from aerospace quality 4340AQ chrome molly steel and well known in NASCAR racing - MSI PORSCHE Wheel Stud Conversion. I have found Acerracing kit with affordable price and made from 6AL4V Aerospace Grade Titanium - Porsche Titanium Wheel Studs & Nuts M14x1.5.

Titanium looks better for me and price is affordable, but i steel have a doubts about motorsport application.
 

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Titanium is valued because of its high tensile strength to weight ratio. But steel is oftentimes stronger. For an application like wheel studs, where the weight difference is minimal in the grand scheme of things, I'd stick with steel.

 

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Lug nuts are not the place to save weight. Titanium has a more finite fatigue life. We use the MSI setup on ALL of our race cars and have for many years. They work fantastic!


Let me know if you have any questions.

Titanium is valued because of its high tensile strength to weight ratio. But steel is oftentimes stronger. For an application like wheel studs, where the weight difference is minimal in the grand scheme of things, I'd stick with steel.

 

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Anyone tried these?
 

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Titanium is relatively light and rather strong but it's also expensive and difficult to work, especially when it comes to welding. However it maintains it's strength at elevated temperatures and that's primarily why it is used in place of aluminum in the aerospace field. The SR-71 is an example of an early mostly titanium aircraft. It flew so fast that it would have overheated conventional alloys, so they went with titanium and that brought on a LOT of headaches during the construction of that interesting airplane.

But you're talking about track days. It's not even racing, so why spend extra money on titanium components?
 
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