Porsche 718 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always owned vehicles that seem no different from 98% of the others on the roads. What have you done to stay "invisible" in either your daily commutes (beyond the obvious: staying in a pack and keeping to the speed limit + 5%) or on country-wide tours (the decision to take back roads vs. freeways, which ultimately comes down to "I'll get there when I get there" vs. "OMG, I am late for a meeting")? I am contemplating driving, not flying, from the midwest to the east coast in March (barring crazy weather). Any advice when staying at hotels, choosing parking garages beyond relying on "your sixth sense"? Use the car cover overnight? Park in an isolated section? Just trying to minimize risk and take sensible precautions (that I never had to think about until now). One's response could be, "**** happens - that is why you have insurance". But I guess I am looking for practical advice [ELI5] that could be baked into various decision-making moments.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
No hotel valet. If unavoidable I drive to the space, valet kid is passenger. Try to find end spots and blend in with other niceish cars. No isolated section where you stand out. And definitely no car cover on a public parking lot. Other then that it is what it is...a Porsche

Just enjoy the trip :)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
Always park in a spot close enough to observe from your hotel window but far enough away from the other cars to avoid dings. Park under the parking lot lights to make it hard for the unsavory to get busy. Also, I second the advice absolutely no car covers it's like advertising "come steal me" I'm valuable. Being inconspicuous is what I strive for that's why I chose Lizard Green.;).
Lived in Iowa City for 3 years......I shoveled more snow in those three years than I have in my entire life. Though, loved the people; it's a safe friendly place.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Keep it dirty while traveling. It'll be somewhat less enticing and won't attract as much unwanted attention as a just-off-the-showroom finish would.

Also, make sure you have great insurance. Nothing is 100% foolproof so being prepared is always a good idea.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Good advice by all. My further personal advice/choices for ongoing 'not sticking out like a sore thumb' is color choice. My first Cayman was Guards Red, my second was Carrera White with black trim Cayman R.............ok......then my next three have been-Black, Mahogany Metallic, and now Night Blue Metallic. While they are great colors.....you do not see me coming a mile away :).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good advice by all. My further personal advice/choices for ongoing 'not sticking out like a sore thumb' is color choice. My first Cayman was Guards Red, my second was Carrera White with black trim Cayman R.............ok......then my next three have been-Black, Mahogany Metallic, and now Night Blue Metallic. While they are great colors.....you do not see me coming a mile away :).
Mine is blue graphite and quite dirty - it has been too cold to wash!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Always park in a spot close enough to observe from your hotel window but far enough away from the other cars to avoid dings. Park under the parking lot lights to make it hard for the unsavory to get busy. Also, I second the advice absolutely no car covers it's like advertising "come steal me" I'm valuable. Being inconspicuous is what I strive for that's why I chose Lizard Green.;).
Lived in Iowa City for 3 years......I shoveled more snow in those three years than I have in my entire life. Though, loved the people; it's a safe friendly place.
Iowa City is a great town to live, work, and raise a family. Easy to get out and explore the world, and the demographics are rich and varied. Yes, very friendly people. I just stopped a fellow driving a 2-yr old Macan at Costco (in the lot before he drove off) this afternoon, and he couldn't have been happier with his purchase. I feel the same way about my new acquisition.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
2,456 Posts
Iowa City is a great town to live, work, and raise a family. Easy to get out and explore the world, and the demographics are rich and varied. Yes, very friendly people. I just stopped a fellow driving a 2-yr old Macan at Costco (in the lot before he drove off) this afternoon, and he couldn't have been happier with his purchase. I feel the same way about my new acquisition.
It is the only place I was able to find diet coke in a glass bottles......tastes so much better and great corn.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I think my attitude towards vehicles ('blending in' and parking) has changed in recent years. Of course, I am hugely respectful of any vehicle I own and those around me, but you know what? It's just a pile of metal and plastic.

Without being too much of a knob, just enjoy the vehicle. Drive slow, drive fast, whatever - I was so concerned with 'what others thought' about my first Porsche, I actually almost ruined it for myself. Avoiding the sports exhaust button, driving overly-conservatively and so on. It actually took a bit of a stern talking to from my wife, in order to actually buy it. I was so worried about 'what others would think'.

These days, I have a different attitude. I don't drive like a hooligan, but I also don't drive like a nun. If I would have gone for an overtake in my S5 (or indeed our current Q5), then I will **** well go for the same overtake in the 718.

As for parking it - my ONLY consideration is whether or not when I get back I will be able to open the driver's door wide enough to be able to get in. I'll be annoyed if someone dings or scratches it, but it'll fix and it's really not the end of the world.

I have a friend who drives an Aston DBS and he doesn't even lock it when he parks up! (I'm not quite THAT relaxed! Ha ha)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,213 Posts
I think you have it right 1812Music. You can fuss about where to park, who is next to you, what might happen, but in the end, the car doesn't perform any different with a ding or road rash. I'll admit I don't want those, but... Those that are considering resale quickly may feel different. However, I'd be curious to know whether a near pristine 2 year old car has a higher value than one that has not been coddled - I think the difference would be negligible, or at least not worth the hassle of constant attention and pampering. I will eat and drink in my car, and drive it on a dirt road to my house.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I think the same as you when it comes to wondering just how much difference it all really makes to the resale value. I am not saying abuse the car, but IMHO anything that can be rectified in the space of an hour, is neither here nor there. I've viewed cars in the past with stone chips on the front and the dealer simply says, "We'll sort those for you" and they do!

Or from the other side of things, if it's going to make a difference then get it tidied up before resale/trade in. Perfect example being our previous 2016 Q5. My wife was hit (gently) from behind in the school run traffic. The rear bumper was cracked and the paint spidered as a result of the flexing. Far from a massive accident. but the bumper was deformed and there was paint damage. Still drivable etc etc. I actually had that repaired by a bodywork specialist for only £200. And you would never know in a million years, that it had ever happened. The work was fantastic (which is why I used him) and it avoided the driver who hit her having to go through insurance. Had I taken that to Audi, they would have fleeced the living s... out of the job. It also absolutely WOULD have affected trade in value.

Moral of the story? You'd be surprised what an amazing job a bodyshop can do for just a couple of hundred pounds, to make your car look like it just rolled out of the showroom. So relax and enjoy it - things can always be repaired or tidied up when you need them to be.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Yes I always say that I don’t buy nice cars so I can wash them.
I like to use them and sell with above average k’s on them but I have enjoyed them.
My dealer told me that I would be surprised at how many Porsche’s that they trade back in that still have the same tank of fuel in them that they originally took delivery with.

It is pretty hard to blend in with a two door exotic sports car
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
My dealer told me of one customer who bought a 991 GT3 and when it came in for trade in 18 months later it had 32 miles on the clock - the guy lived just under 16 miles from the dealer.

I just cannot understand that. Even if I had £1bn and a massive car collection, you could be your backside I would have driven every single one at leat once - including the 250GTO! ;) :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
With respect, I'm going the other way with my opinion on this topic. I didn't dream about this car most of my life, been fortunate enough to be able to aquire one, only to treat it like "just a pile of metal and plastic". If that were my criteria for a car, I'd have bought a Hyundai Elantra (no offense to Hyundai or it's owners).

I neither eat nor drink in my car, and I certainly don't run up dirt roads like I don't care about the consequences to the paint job. Like anything else in life, I treat other drivers with respect, both while moving and parking and in turn I find they mostly do the same.

I keep the exterior and interior looking showroom as much as possible and I've had countless other car brand owners come up to me and comment on the fact.

So, IMO, this beautiful, well engineered machine wasn't meant to blend in. Take care of her, and she'll do the same for you. ?

G
 

· Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
For me, “blending in” means being “subtle”.

Subtle in:
- colours (classy and non provoking)
- driving style (courteous)
- parking places (with the main crowd)
- accessories (cool vs outlandish)
- driver image (friendly)

Subjective I know. But that’s how I picture the ideal way to “blend” into the crowd without losing uniqueness, particularly with this awesome ride ?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
For me, “blending in” means being “subtle”.

Subtle in:
- colours (classy and non provoking)
- driving style (courteous)
- parking places (with the main crowd)
- accessories (cool vs outlandish)
- driver image (friendly)

Subjective I know. But that’s how I picture the ideal way to “blend” into the crowd without losing uniqueness, particularly with this awesome ride ?
? To you, sir!
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top