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Here's what the website says about warranty and rust holes (see below). Can you buy or should you buy additional rust proofing from the dealer? Or is it even offered?

The warranty periods begin on the day of delivery to the customer. The following periods apply:
4 year / 50,000 mls (80,000 km) warranty for all new vehicles whichever occurs first*;
2-year warranty for genuine Porsche parts, exchange parts and accessories, which are used or sold outside of warranty work. The warranty period for Porsche parts which are used in connection with warranty work ends contemporaneously with the warranty period for the purchased item which has become defective;
12-year long-life warranty against rust holes in the bodyshell. (please refer to the conditions in the Warranty and Maintenance handbook)
Certified Pre-Owned Warranty is 2 years / 100,000 mls (160,000 km), once the vehicle is outside the original vehicle warranty period. Warranty can be claimed from any Porsche partner across the world.*Applies for vehicles purchased and registered in the USA and Canada (outside the USA and Canada 2 years / unlimited miles).Warranty and Customer Information (PDF; 1.4 MB)
 

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Because of the heat generated by the engine, Porsche specifically warn against undercoating as a fire risk.

Greg
ps--I wouldn't be buying ANY additions from the dealer.
 

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Everything the dealership offers.....just say no! The general rule is........poorly skilled contractors do the work, do low quality, and do not stand behind the finished product. Case in point......Park Place Porsche of Dallas.
 

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I usually go to my own garage guy for things like rust proofing, more so because I trust the man than lack of trust with the dealership's own staff.
 

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The Cayman has a hot-galvanized all-steel body. Add on rustproofing is generally be a bad idea since it tends to trap moisture and dirt. And with a galvanized frame, it's sort of pointless.


To reduce the chance of rust, keep your car clean. Go to a car wash that sprays water "up" under the car: that is probably the best thing to do for most cars including your Cayman.
 
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The Cayman has a hot-galvanized all-steel body. Add on rustproofing is generally be a bad idea since it tends to trap moisture and dirt. And with a galvanized frame, it's sort of pointless.


To reduce the chance of rust, keep your car clean. Go to a car wash that sprays water "up" under the car: that is probably the best thing to do for most cars including your Cayman.
While I agree that getting water 'up under' is useful, especially where they salt the roads, I'd also say that a commercial car wash is the worst thing you can do for the topside paint.

Greg
 

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While I agree that getting water 'up under' is useful, especially where they salt the roads, I'd also say that a commercial car wash is the worst thing you can do for the topside paint.

Greg
This. You own a Porsche sports car. It really should not go through an automated car wash unless you're absolutely sure of three things:

1). The chemical agents used will not strip off wax and polymer protectants
2). The water used is filtered and recycled
3). The facility is either touchless and without a conveyor track (which typically means #1 is false since the washing agents have to work harder) or has BOTH enough ground clearance (at least five inches) and track width (at least 11 inches) to accommodate your car's tires, which can be up to 11 inches wide depending on the model.

I take mine to a car wash 17 miles away right now because it's the only one in the area that I'm sure meets all three criteria, and it offers both an automated and a hand wash, the latter of which is the ideal type of wash. That said, I am a proponent of the occasional (not regular) visit to the self-service car wash with high-pressure spray jets precisely so areas that both an automated and hand wash rarely clean well can be targeted, such as the underbody, wheel wells, and radiators/intakes at the front of the car.
 
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......It really should not go through an automated car wash unless you're absolutely sure of three things:

1). The chemical agents used will not strip off wax and polymer protectants
2). The water used is filtered and recycled
3). The facility is either touchless and without a conveyor track (which typically means #1 is false since the washing agents have to work harder) or has BOTH enough ground clearance (at least five inches) and track width (at least 11 inches) to accommodate your car's tires, which can be up to 11 inches wide depending on the model........

Good points.


I go to a local self-service car wash and use the wand (with plain water) to spray the underside. This, in my view, is really the best thing to do to clear out rust and salt from road cars.
I still call this place "The 25 cent Car Wash", but as you can imagine, it's been a long time since you only needed a quarter to wash your car. ;)


I have a decent pressure washer at home, but due to the proximity of this self-serve place, I usually go there to clean the underside of the car (and I always get wet so I always bring towels for the seats). I suspect I'll use this place to do the underside of the Cayman too.


I'll probably wash the Cayman by hand on the top side.


To be honest, we do use a fully-automated car wash for our 2017 Honda CRV and Chevy cargo van and we're had good results (supplemented by the usual garden-hose-in-the-driveway wash). This automated car wash has a "spray up" feature that washes the underside which I like. I hadn't thought about the fact that they might use chemicals but it's worth looking into. I bought the van new in '09 and the paint still looks great on it.
 
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