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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most of you will not respond - I get it! No worries. I've been loitering around this site for over a year - mostly looking and learning and occasionally commenting. This is an odd request I'll admit and maybe not relevant to this site. Tempting fate, here goes. I've been a truck guy my entire life with the occasional reliable Jap car scattered in. Never owned a sports car and never really had any desire to have one. Something happened when I approached 60 yrs. old - what if I die without ever owning a go-fast car? I stuck my toe in the water with a custom Big Dog chopper nearly a decade ago and rode it for a couple of years before I got bored with it. Keep in mind, I'm in Florida and the roads are flat and mostly straight so there's no real thrill in driving. I'm afraid the 718 may fall into the same trap as my Big Dog. I know no one knows me better than me, but am hoping for honest opinions, especially from those that may have come from a similar background. I need to either poop or get of the pot. Thanks much for any replies.
 

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Yes! Let me expand. I have owned "sporty" cars (RX-7, TR7, 240Z, Etc.) in the past but never a Porsche. I sold my last 2 seater (RX-7) when the kids came along 18 years ago (and I was 37). Since then I have owned "sporty" Sedans/SUV's (Audi S4 & Q5, Infiniti G35, BMW 335i, Range Rover Evoque) but I have always maintained my itch for the 2 seat sports car, with my dream car being a Porsche. Recently I have had several family members and friends who have either come down with serious illnesses or have passed away. Let's just say the phrase, "Life is too short" has really hit home for me. Now that the kids can drive themselves, their education and our house is paid for, I figured it was now or never to own the Porsche I always dreamed of. What's the worse thing that can happen? If I don't like it or get bored with it in a year or two, I'll sell it. It might cost me $10-20k but I won't have any regrets.
 
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My friend the 718 is just a car and I would only recommend it if your finances permit. If the money side is covered then I say why not. I read allot of posts about people trying to stretch their finances to make it happen......I just wouldn't do that. My rule of thumb if you can't buy something twice without impacting your finances then I wouldn't...............lest it will be an unnecessary stressor.
 

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My friend the 718 is just a car and I would only recommend it if your finances permit. If the money side is covered then I say why not. I read allot of posts about people trying to stretch their finances to make it happen......I just wouldn't do that. My rule of thumb if you can't buy something twice without impacting your finances then I wouldn't...............lest it will be an unnecessary stressor.
This is great advice -- and that comment is coming from someone who wouldn't normally be able to comfortably afford a new Porsche. (Inheritance made mine possible comfortably.)

That parenthetical said, I have a huge itch to get back into motorcycling, to the point where I've comparison shopped and have my choices down to four bikes. But barring a large promotion or move up elsewhere -- a possibility, but certainly not something I'd bank on (pun intended) -- I'm probably going to pass for now. I can do it, but it wouldn't be comfortable financially.

I would say do it -- but plan a driving trip to the Appalachians at least once a year. Only there will you truly appreciate what a sports car -- any sports car -- provides. No regrets!
 

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I know no one knows me better than me, but am hoping for honest opinions, especially from those that may have come from a similar background. I need to either poop or get of the pot. Thanks much for any replies.
My context has some similarities... I was getting more, er, "mature", and wondering if I'd ever get a proper sports car and if I would regret it if not. In my case, I've owned other performance vehicles, but nothing so focused as a 718, and never a convertible. I ended up taking the plunge and am happy I did.

Two specific aspects that really have made it great for me are the handling and the open top. The handling is incredible, and I find myself taking the long way home from work through the local twisties quite often just to taste the handling. It's also my first convertible and I was worried I wouldn't like it. But turns out I love it and lower the top as often as possible. I find it exhilarating driving through forest and along the coast with the top down.

So... depends on what's important to you and if you'll be able to use the car that way. I.e. convertible in Florida should work well, I'd think, but not having access to curves might make it less enticing. Then again, there's always road trips and PCA Autocross events!
 

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More or less the same answer - if finances permit, go for it if you have a strong itch. Porsches retain their value well in comparison to other cars - if you own for a year or two and get bored and sell, it won't be a major financial hit. I've had the itch for a long time but held off until recently. I objectively have been able to afford one for a couple of decades, but I'm inherently conservative with my personal finances (i.e. cheap). I finally pulled the trigger at 57 after paying off primary and vacation houses, 3 private college educations, having retirement safely covered, and still being in my peak earning years with a sustainable job. I'm enjoying the car immensely largely because it's a phenomenal machine. However, a it helps that it's 'guilt-free' knowing I didn't compromise anything for my family finances or future. If you don't have a strong itch, $60,000 to $200,000+ for a Porsche (or any car) is a waste of money.
 

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I’m hesitant to impart my advice, whether yes or no. However, for me....I felt like i have lived a fairly practical life. I really don’t have any “toys”, such as a boat and a small plane, both of which my Dad had as I was growing up. I decided now was a great time financially to take the plunge and own not only my first proper sports car, but a Porsche. The Cayman may not have the cache of the 911, but I love the size, weight and mid engine design.

In regards to Florida roads....I feel your pain!!!! Depending where you live in Florida, going up to Georgia and tail of the dragon vicinity is a possibility. Something I want to do.

I am planning a road trip to the Philadelphia area with a stop/ detour to the Porsche Experience Center this May. Since my job has me up in the PA/NJ area several times a month, I plan to keep it there for the summer at a family members house. Longer term, I wouldn’t mind transferring to SoCal for work (keeping my home in FL). The roads out west seem amazing compared to Florida.
 

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Another suggestion is to rent a 718 from Turo for a few days, to see how you feel about the car, and how it would fit your needs. At the very least you would have a lot of fun with no commitment.

Also, consider a manual transmission, which will provide a lot more engagement with the car, even when it's on flat and straight roads. I really love being at the front of a line of cars at a red light or stop sign, and accelerating just past the speed limit by rowing through the gears ;-)
 

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I say Yes go for it if finances permit. I have never owned a sports car except for my wife's Mazada rx7. I owned a boat, and 2 trucks. I too had family memebers and friends (brother and mom pass away back to back) pass away and yes "life is too damm short"

Sold the boat and a 2011 Toyota Tundra and used that money to purchase my NEW toy. I use the car more than I did my boat. I'm glad i made the trade.



Yes! Let me expand. I have owned "sporty" cars (RX-7, TR7, 240Z, Etc.) in the past but never a Porsche. I sold my last 2 seater (RX-7) when the kids came along 18 years ago (and I was 37). Since then I have owned "sporty" Sedans/SUV's (Audi S4 & Q5, Infiniti G35, BMW 335i, Range Rover Evoque) but I have always maintained my itch for the 2 seat sports car, with my dream car being a Porsche. Recently I have had several family members and friends who have either come down with serious illnesses or have passed away. Let's just say the phrase, "Life is too short" has really hit home for me. Now that the kids can drive themselves, their education and our house is paid for, I figured it was now or never to own the Porsche I always dreamed of. What's the worse thing that can happen? If I don't like it or get bored with it in a year or two, I'll sell it. It might cost me $10-20k but I won't have any regrets.
 

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Of Siren* cars, it can truly be said:

Better than drugs...
Cheaper than therapy....
More faithful than a mistress


But....like Ulysses tied to the mast, you have to hear the Siren's song and be drawn to it -- knowing most around you have wax in their ears. Most, apart from us cursed/blessed here.

*a seductively beautiful or charming woman, esp. one who beguiles men (Urban Dictionary, #2).
 

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Of Siren* cars, it can truly be said:

Better than drugs...
Cheaper than therapy....
More faithful than a mistress


But....like Ulysses tied to the mast, you have to hear the Siren's song and be drawn to it -- knowing most around you have wax in their ears. Most, apart from us cursed/blessed here.

*a seductively beautiful or charming woman, esp. one who beguiles men (Urban Dictionary, #2).
You know that the Siren's song was so beautiful and intoxicating so as to lead sailors to their death on the rocks, right?:eek:
 

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Another suggestion is to rent a 718 from Turo for a few days, to see how you feel about the car, and how it would fit your needs. At the very least you would have a lot of fun with no commitment.
Your question is very pertinent and interesting. I think Ironman gave you the best advice. These things are expensive and you want to make your due diligence before buying.


I must say that I love smaller and nimble cars over big, spacious and confortable cars/trucks. If I was allowed, I would buy a go-kart and drive it to go to work. I have friends that are all the opposite. They love bigger vehicles. Some love big pickups. When I drive their expensive and luxurious 4x4 or pickups, for a moment or for a long drive, I don't really enjoy enough them to say I must have one. I just don't appreciate their specific qualities. Its just not for me.


All this to say that when they happen to drive every sport car I get, they have the same feelings. Its not for them and they just don't get it. So much money and no space or confort and you are seated so low, you just don't have the same visibility...


I know nobody that is a VERY SOLID truck fanatic that that at the same time loves smaller sport cars. Could be different for you. For this reason, maybe you want to go with Ironman's advice.



Good luck and let us know your impression/decision.
 

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"

I'm a 'young' 70, and a recently ex-motorcyclist when I found the cycle just too "abrupt" to continue to be fun to ride.

The Boxster has three main enjoyments for me:
1. twisty roads--which could be an issue in Florida,
2. top down--nice in any reasonable weather--whatever that is for you, and
3. "just cruisin' around".

If the money is OK and "two outa three ain't bad" then go ahead.
 

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Better than drugs...
Cheaper than therapy....
More faithful than a mistress



*a seductively beautiful or charming woman, esp. one who beguiles men (Urban Dictionary, #2).
D a m n! That's a great statement! I'm using that somewhere, at some point and time... :D Thanks ZuffenHouse!
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks to all that responded. After much thought, I think it all comes down to whether or not one has the passion for performance and fine engineering. Clearly, you all have that. I thought that if I hung around this forum long enough some of that would rub off. Unfortunately (or fortunately) I have not heard the Siren's song and the itch is only fleeting. There is not doubt that I would enjoy the car for a while, but inevitably be disappointed to find that within a year or two of ownership I saw the 718 as only another vehicle that I had to maintain. For those reasons, I believe it best to divest myself in this self-tormenting, sports car whim. Someday I may rent one just to experience it! Enjoy your cars and, above all, be safe.
 

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Thanks to all that responded. After much thought, I think it all comes down to whether or not one has the passion for performance and fine engineering. Clearly, you all have that. I thought that if I hung around this forum long enough some of that would rub off. Unfortunately (or fortunately) I have not heard the Siren's song and the itch is only fleeting. There is not doubt that I would enjoy the car for a while, but inevitably be disappointed to find that within a year or two of ownership I saw the 718 as only another vehicle that I had to maintain. For those reasons, I believe it best to divest myself in this self-tormenting, sports car whim. Someday I may rent one just to experience it! Enjoy your cars and, above all, be safe.
What about a Raptor? You'll have your truck, and big-ass acceleration too. Even when you are not accelerating hard, you'll appreciate the power. And as an older gentleman, you won't have the feeling that you're an older gentleman in a younger man's car. Myself, I have zero problem being an older gentleman in a younger man's car.

Good luck
 

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Thanks to all that responded. After much thought, I think it all comes down to whether or not one has the passion for performance and fine engineering. Clearly, you all have that. I thought that if I hung around this forum long enough some of that would rub off. Unfortunately (or fortunately) I have not heard the Siren's song and the itch is only fleeting. There is not doubt that I would enjoy the car for a while, but inevitably be disappointed to find that within a year or two of ownership I saw the 718 as only another vehicle that I had to maintain. For those reasons, I believe it best to divest myself in this self-tormenting, sports car whim. Someday I may rent one just to experience it! Enjoy your cars and, above all, be safe.
Best of luck! Thank you for the question it has, through the learned comments, yielded some valuable insight for us all.
 

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I split my driving time between a 2010 Toyota Tundra and a 2018 Cayman. The Tundra is just so functional that I can’t get rid of it. It is astonishing how it has held its value and how much #@$% I can carry in it. But I always feel like I do before exercising or going to the doctor when driving it - I am being smart and doing the right thing, but it sucks to be in that truck instead of the Cayman! In good weather, when I am alone or not hauling stuff around, the Cayman is almost always the vehicle I am driving.

A Raptor is definitely on my consideration list in the future. Chester - do you have one?
 
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